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I own a netbook whose default (recommended) resolution is 1024 x 600.

However, when I fire up the display (graphics) properties page, I am shown that the display is a Digital Flat Panel (1280 x 1024 60 Hz).

Does this imply that the display actually supports 1280 x 1024 resolution as default?

I am confused, since I don't see any option to set the above resolution, and I've failed to try saving the resolution under "Custom" resolutions inside the graphics properties page.

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closed as not a real question by Breakthrough, 8088, Indrek, Diogo, Randolph West Aug 29 '12 at 7:25

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
NB: I have installed the latest display drivers already, downloaded off the manufacturer's support portal. The drivers are up-to-date. –  xibalban Aug 29 '12 at 3:01

2 Answers 2

No, most likely the OS (Im assuming Windows) is incorrectly detecting the netbook's LCD. Check the manufacturers website for the proper display drivers.

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I would assume that the display is just using the default driver, based on an ideal LCD flat panel. Installing the proper driver for the laptop's LCD screen might help (check Windows Update or your manufacturer's drivers), although they usually aren't required. In this case, it's just a cosmetic issue, since the proper resolution is detected.

It's possible that the display could handle a signal at 1280x1024, although this would be downscaled by the LCD hardware to 1024x600 anyways.

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