Take the 2-minute tour ×
Super User is a question and answer site for computer enthusiasts and power users. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have an Excel spreadsheet that has a list of names in column A. What I'd like to do is parse out all the names in the column that I don't know and their rows. For example, in a spreadsheet of 100 names, let's say I know 39 of them and their row data. I don't need to see them in the spreadsheet - what I need to see are the remaining 61 that I don't know and their rows.

Hope that makes sense, and that something like this is possible!

Thanks!

share|improve this question

migrated from stackoverflow.com Aug 30 '12 at 21:36

This question came from our site for professional and enthusiast programmers.

    
Straightforward but you should provide us with your data layout, ie.e where are the names stored that you do know? –  brettdj Aug 30 '12 at 0:11
    
Thanks for the fast response! Where should the names be stored? I can easily store them in the same spreadsheet, in a separate text file, or I can enter them directly in a formula, whichever is most flexible. –  user1631862 Aug 30 '12 at 0:24
    
It depends whether this is a one off (put them inside the spreadsheet), or repetitive. And whether the known names change or stay stable –  brettdj Aug 30 '12 at 0:32
add comment

2 Answers

Throw the names you do know in a separate sheet in the same workbook, then do a vlookup in the first worksheet to determine if the names are known or not known, and filter on that?

You'll get much better answers, I'm sure, but that's what I do, ad hoc.

share|improve this answer
    
I rethought this a little, and realized that you also want the row number. If you can sort your known names in alpha order, to get the row, you can use match. I tried to add more details about this, but now I'm called away, and I can't delete this, for some reason. Anyway, look into the Match function in Excel; it would return the row number, assuming the range that it's searching is in alpha order. –  Julie Sep 1 '12 at 2:22
add comment

Yea, like julie said - this is a very basic use of vlookup.

Vlookup Example

You can then sort on the "Do we Know?" column - to put all the ones we don't "know" to the top.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.