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I've just noticed that Firefox has deleted 90% of my bookmarks. Mainly those which are rarely used.

How can I prevent it for doing it? I do not know if it deleted them on upgrade or during some other events? I am not even sure when it happened, but it must have been more that one and half month.

My bookmarks were synced among all computers, and now I lost bookmarks on all devices.

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closed as not a real question by Xavierjazz, Canadian Luke, 8088, Nifle, Sathya Sep 8 '12 at 13:06

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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Firefox has NEVER deleted a single bookmark. I have bookmarks that are 12 years old. This is clearly a setting you selected. –  Ramhound Sep 5 '12 at 16:33
    
Actually I found that Firefox in some cases will move old bookmarks into new folder called "Unsorted bookmarks". It is found on the bottom of bookmarks and it pretty hard to notice is with users who have a lot of bookmarks. If anyone opens this question, then I would add this as an answer. I think this will help a lot of users. If you agree on with me, then please vote for reopen. –  JoeM Sep 8 '12 at 17:02
    
@Ramhound vote for reopen? I explained why. –  JoeM Sep 8 '12 at 17:03
    
No, Firefox doesn't move bookmarks into "Unsorted Bookmarks." That folder is for bookmarks made when the user clicks the bookmark (star) icon in the address bar and doesn't do anything else. Perhaps an extension or 3rd party bookmark manager did this, but there's nothing in Firefox itself that will automatically move or remove bookmarks. Even configuring Sync on disparate (but already, and differently) configured computers doesn't cause this. –  afrazier Sep 9 '12 at 16:51
    
@afrazier It may be, but it happened on Firefox update. Bookmarks were simply removed into this folder. I do not use any other bookmarking tool and I sort all my bookmarks into folders, subfolders, subsbufolders... –  JoeM Sep 10 '12 at 11:58

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Your question is apparently based on the false premise that "Firefox deletes old bookmarks". This is a false premise because, out of the box, Firefox does not, routinely, do this. Your question ought to have been, "Why are my older bookmarks no longer accessible in Firefox?"

Anyway, see this Mozilla KB article and see if anything there helps. It could be that the Firefox bookmarks sync server accidentally lost some of your bookmarks due to unintentional data loss, and then proceeded to sync those changes to each computer. It's hard to say for certain what happened. But it is definitely not because Firefox is programmed to delete old bookmarks for no reason.

With that said, some third-party Firefox extensions may have enough permissions to do this. So I can't rule out the possibility that there exists some extension out there that will delete old bookmarks. I don't know what such an extension would be called, though.

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I know it keeps backups in bookmarkbackups folder. However, all in there are those with most bookmarks deleted. Does it keep them anywhere else? For example, how can I restore bookmarks 6 months old? –  JoeM Sep 6 '12 at 13:23
    
vote for reopen? I explained why. –  JoeM Sep 8 '12 at 17:06

Something else has happened to cause that. I've got Firefox bookmarks that date from the Netscape Navigator days and haven't been visited since Firefox was called Phoenix, and haven't lost a single one.

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vote for reopen? I explained why. –  JoeM Sep 8 '12 at 17:06

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