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I would like to access my personal IMAP server through my corporate firewall. This is allowed provided I use the corporate proxy server, which is an HTTP proxy server. I cannot figure out how to configure Thunderbird to honor this proxy server, though. It honors it for HTTP traffic, but not for IMAP and SMTP.

Thunderbird: 15.0 OS: OSX 10.8.1

AFAIK, there is no SOCKS proxy available, just an HTTP proxy. Also, the HTTP proxy allows other protocols to go through it (c.f. Can I tunnel other protocol through an HTTP proxy?). Using an add-on for a solution would be fine. Thanks!

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'Also, the HTTP proxy allows other protocols to go through it.' - Are you sure about that? –  gertvdijk Sep 11 '12 at 13:00
    
I'm 1000% positive it does; I do it all the time. –  Joe Casadonte Sep 11 '12 at 13:39
    
Learned something new, thanks. Good you've updated your question accordingly. –  gertvdijk Sep 11 '12 at 13:45
    
Did you tick "Use this proxy server for all protocols" in options, adv, net, settings? –  RedGrittyBrick Sep 11 '12 at 13:54
    
@Joe Casadonte Sadly this is not always true. Some proxies try to parse the requests. When they fail to parse HTTP they give up. In which case you need use something else to bypass the proxy. E.g. IP over DNS. (and yes, that exists and I admire it for its hack value). –  Hennes Sep 11 '12 at 14:27
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2 Answers 2

My (oldish) Thunderbird has a checkbox in the "Connection Settings" to make Thunderbird use the http proxy setting for all protocols. Did you try that?

Otherwise maybe this helps?

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I think this option only affects the content loading of email itself, e.g. external images. It does not affect the IMAP/POP3 protocol itself, which requires direct connection. –  dma_k Apr 10 '13 at 13:09
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up vote 0 down vote accepted

For Mac & Windows there is a program called Proxifier that can do what the OS itself cannot. Note that this is a non-free commercial program and I've only tried it under Mac OSX 10.8.1 (ML). It worked flawlessly for me, though, so I guess I can call this one closed.

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