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I have an i7 3770k, Asus P8Z77-Pro and two drives. An SSD 120Gb and a regular HDD 500Gb.

I'm interesting in using the SSD with the Intel's Smart Response technology.

As stated in the requirements:

  • Intel® Z68/Z77/H77/Q77 Express Chipset-based desktop board
  • Intel® Core™ Processor in the LGA 1155 package System BIOS with SATA mode set to RAID
  • Intel Rapid Storage Technology software 10.5 version release or later
  • Single hard disk drive or multiple drives in a single RAID volume
  • Solid State Drive (SSD) with a minimum capacity of 18.6GB
  • Operating system: Microsoft Windows Vista* (32-bit and 64-bit editions), Microsoft Windows 7* (32-bit and 64-bit editions)

How can I create a single RAID volume with a single HDD?

The raid utility (Intel Rapid Storage Technology rom utility) only allow me to create raid 0 with ~250Gb and Raid 1 with ~110Gb (which seem normal). No option to create a Single Raid Volume with a Single HDD. Also, If I remove the SSD the raid utility is not accessible.

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The core notion of RAID is to use multiple hard drives (to achieve different purposes depending on the type of RAID you want). RAID with a single drive just doesn't make any sense.

The Intel doc is a bit ambiguous, but it really says
(Single hard disk drive) or (multiple drives in a single RAID volume),
and not
(Single hard disk drive or multiple drives) in a single RAID volume.

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That is something Intel says in the requirements. There must be a meaning behind it. Also, there are lots of Smart Response examples in the internet that use one HDD and an SSD. – Odys Sep 15 '12 at 10:01
    
@Odys RAID is about redundancy across disks. It makes no sense to create a single-disk JBOD 'array' or a degraded RAID1 array. – gertvdijk Sep 15 '12 at 10:02
2  
@Odys - what Intel are getting at is that the SSD can only be used against a single volume. That single volume can be a single, normal disk, or multiple disks presented as a single volume through RAID. It clearly says "or". There is no way of doing RAID on a single disk because the A in RAID indicates more than one (Array). – Mark Henderson Sep 15 '12 at 10:03
    
Using both your SSD and your normal drive in a RAID is possible (but in your case not useful at all, unless you want a mirrored set, but you'll lose a lot of space and probably speed). But your question is how to create a RAID using a single drive, which is simply not possible. The Intel doc is a bit ambiguous, but it really says "(Single hard disk drive) or (multiple drives in a single RAID volume)". – m4573r Sep 15 '12 at 10:05

I think you might be mis-reading what Intel have written:

Single hard disk drive or multiple drives in a single RAID volume

This is ambiguous, because it could mean:

  • Single Hard Disk Drive
  • Multiple Drives in a Single RAID Volume

OR

  • Single Hard Disk Drive OR Multiple Drives
  • In a RAID Volume.

They mean the first one. It is impossible to do RAID on a single disk, because the A in RAID requires more than one.

What Intel is implying is that the SSD can be used against a single volume. That volume can be a RAID set, or a single normal disk.

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