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My HDD is failing (So says CrystalDiskInfo 4.5) and I have been recommended to create a image using Macrium or something similar.
Right now I have a Seagate Momentus ST9320423AS 320GB.

My 320GB is partitioned into
C: 147GB
RECOVERY(D:) 17.4GB
HP_TOOLS(E:) 99.3MB
H: 132GB

I was planning on:

  • creating an image of H: drive where my entire data is
  • then use the recovery disks to restore my laptop back to the factory state.
  • then restore the entire data using the image

  • However, if that doesn't solve the problem I will have to buy a new one and I was planning on something like 1TB. This 1TB will obviously not be partitioned like the 320GB and may or may not have the same drive letters as the 320GB. So in this case, will the restoration of data be possible using the image?

    Note: H: drive also contains a lot of programs installed in it and I'm pretty sure a lot of them would stop working once C: drive is restored to factory state. In that case, what do I do? Will they appear in the control panel? Also, will restoration be possible if the new HDD's drive size is larger than the size of the imaged drive? Like 1TB can have a drive of size 300GB while H: drive is only 132GB


    You can read more about my problem in my previous question.

    The software I will be using:
    macrium

    share|improve this question
        
    I hesitate to post this as an answer because I cannot be definitive, but in past experience I was able to write an image, including partitions, to a larger drive, and later use a 3rd party disk partition utility to resize the partitions without losing the data. I am not familiar with the software you reference however, and I cannot assure you of its operation. –  Mr.Wizard Sep 19 '12 at 4:45
        
    @Mr.Wizard There is the image and here is the link –  Fasih Khatib Sep 19 '12 at 6:50
        
    AAAARRGGHH!!! IT WONT LIST THE DRIVES!!! WHAT ON EARTH! –  Fasih Khatib Sep 19 '12 at 7:14
        
    Those 'drives' are usually volumes designating actual partitions. I couldn't really understand one thing - how are you planning on restoring the failing HDD to a working state with recovery disks? –  XXL Sep 19 '12 at 7:21
    1  
    I said either an USB storage device (that you can boot from) or you can go ahead and burn a disk image that is also available on the developer's site = multiple options. –  XXL Sep 19 '12 at 15:56

    1 Answer 1

    up vote 2 down vote accepted

    So in this case, will the restoration of data be possible using the image? Also, will restoration be possible if the new HDD's drive size is larger than the size of the imaged drive? Like 1TB can have a drive of size 300GB while H: drive is only 132GB

    Yes, pretty much every cloning software (at least any that is well know and has good reviews) has enough intelligence to be able to restore to a larger partition. They will ask you whether you want to increase the source partition to fill up the target (thus resulting in more free space than was available in the original volume) or if you want to restore it exactly as is and leave the excess as unpartitioned space. You can choose whichever suits your needs.

    H: drive also contains a lot of programs installed in it and I'm pretty sure a lot of them would stop working once C: drive is restored to factory state.

    In many cases, yes. You may be able to run the programs by creating new shortcuts to them, but it depends on the nature of the programs. If they are simple or designed to be portable, then you should be fine, but if they are complex and keep files on the system drive or install deep roots into the registry and such, then you will likely need to reinstall them for them to work.

    In that case, what do I do? Will they appear in the control panel?

    Do you mean the Start menu? No, the original installation from the factor does not have or know about any of the programs you installed later, so it will not have links to them in the Start menu, the desktop, or anywhere else.

    share|improve this answer
        
    One more question: Are disk images similar to ISO Images where you simply extract the content out like with WinRAR or it has something to do while booting? –  Fasih Khatib Sep 19 '12 at 6:27
        
    They will ask you whether you want to increase the source partition to fill up the target (thus resulting in more free space than was available in the original volume) I would go for this option. Then this means that (300GB MINUS 132GB) would be free space in the new HDD's drive, right? –  Fasih Khatib Sep 19 '12 at 6:36
        
    > One more question: Are disk images similar to ISO Images where you simply extract the content out like with WinRAR or it has something to do while booting? They can be. It depends on the format of the image. If it is a raw image (byte-for-byte copy), then yes, you should be able to use a program to view (or even modify) the contents or mount it with a drive letter. If it is a proprietary format or compressed (as many tend to be), then you will need the program that created it. –  Synetech Sep 19 '12 at 14:17
        
    > I would go for this option. Then this means that (300GB MINUS 132GB) would be free space in the new HDD's drive, right? Yes. If the original, cloned volume was 132GB and you restore it into a 300GB volume, then you will end up with the original volume (same files, folders, etc.) but with 168GB more free space than before. –  Synetech Sep 19 '12 at 14:19
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    Yes it is, just like Macrium, except that DIXML has a fairly good track record (because Runtime Software is a company that specializes in file-system and disk related software). CloneZilla access the hardware directly, so it is more powerful and has a GUI as well, but implemented with text characters instead. –  Synetech Sep 19 '12 at 15:29

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