Take the 2-minute tour ×
Super User is a question and answer site for computer enthusiasts and power users. It's 100% free, no registration required.

My Windows XP was recently corrupted and my hard disk was password protected. In an effort to retrieve my old info I slaved my hard disk to a friends PC.

I changed the permissions on my old, slaved drive and all was well. I then installed a secondary 250 GB slave so I could backup the data on his 'D:' (primary slave) drive, which he promised to me after I was done.

Then, when I uninstalled my old drive, his primary slave was no longer present in 'My Computer'. I removed the new 250 GB drive, but his primary slave was still not visible.

I did a little research and found that I could reassign the drive letter to make it visible via the disk manager and reassigned the 'D:' designation. The drive is now visible, but it says that the disk is unformatted, which is obviously not true.

How can I rectify this without formatting the drive?

share|improve this question
    
Most probably you have to try recover it through TestDisk and download Swissknife to format the raw drive. –  avirk Sep 21 '12 at 14:58

1 Answer 1

Try to recover the volume with TestDisk.

share|improve this answer
    
TestDisk only allows to get the data, there's no mean to turn it back into NTFS without losing data. If there is ? please let me know. –  coding_idiot Apr 14 '13 at 16:37
    
A lost volume can be recovered in-place. Lost files, however, should be recovered to some other volume to avoid inadvertent overwriting of other lost files on the same volume. –  Ansgar Wiechers Apr 14 '13 at 18:41
    
please let me know how to recover a lost volume in place. I've recovered all files from that. –  coding_idiot Apr 14 '13 at 22:17
    
This is covered by the documentation. –  Ansgar Wiechers Apr 15 '13 at 18:04

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.