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Today, I discovered my team's PPTP passwords expire and I had to figure this out by looking through log files (/var/log/messages).

Part 1 of my question is there a way I can start up my PPTP client service from Linux so that I get a precise error message on my screen indicating the password expired. Currently when I launch from a KDE or GNOME applet all I see is a generic failure message.

Second, is there a tool on linux (preferably gui) that will allow me to change the password. Linux is the client side; I do not have login access on the server. This will eliminate my need to boot a VM or separate box to deal with expired passwords.

Thanks,

SetJmp

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1 Answer 1

Yes, there is a tool to change a password. Sorry, it's a command line tool. As root type the following:

passwd <username>

Then try to start your connection as you do usually provided you changed the password in its properties to the new one.

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This will change the password for <username> on the linux system, not the VPN. –  SetJmp Sep 26 '12 at 20:02
    
@SetJmp who is controlling the server side of the VPN? –  Serge Sep 26 '12 at 20:04
    
An administrator controls the server and I do not have login access. I have just clarified the second part of the question to indicate I expect a client side solution. On mac for example, when I attempt to login to the VPN with an expired password I am prompted to change the VPN password via a GUI. The ideal Linux solution would work the same way instead of causing me to dig up the error message from a log file and then boot up a mac to change the password. –  SetJmp Sep 26 '12 at 23:28
    
No. There is no common client side solution to change a password on a remote machine if it is already locked as far as I know. As for changing password remotely for PPTP connection when it is already timed out I am also in doubt. However, the Mac's software is out of my scope so I guess it has the ability to know that the password will be expired soon so it warns you and offers to change it? –  Serge Sep 26 '12 at 23:52

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