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I am coming from Linux and trying to get a Mac to do what I want it to do. The question is what is the best tool to use. I want to mount (unmount) several remote disks. If I go into a terminal I can do the trick by

mount -t smbfs //username:pass@addr /Users/me/RemoteDisks/mnt1

Since I want to mount several disks I would like to put all of the information into a file, store it in Documents/subfolder and make a link to it on the desktop (or somewhere better, if there is a better place). At the moment I have manually run the appropriate command in the terminal and the remote disk is mounted and I see its contents. What I need is a one click method to run a file to mount all the disks.

I tried Apple script but that didn't like my commands. I don't know exactly what it is expecting to see and perhaps Apple script is the wrong tool. I have no problems in Linux, but the Mac is new to me and I don't know what I should be using.

Thanks, Ilan

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migrated from stackoverflow.com Oct 1 '12 at 3:07

This question came from our site for professional and enthusiast programmers.

up vote 1 down vote accepted

AppleScript is a completely different language, with different commands, syntax, and capabilities; for what you are trying to do, a shell script is the way to go. First, make your file a proper shell script by starting it with a shebang line:

#!/bin/bash
mount -t smbfs //username:pass@addr /Users/me/RemoteDisks/mnt1
...etc

Then, make it executable with chmod +x /path/to/script. Finally, if you want it to be double-ckickable in the finder, add the extension ".command" to its filename so the Finder will know what to do when you double-click.

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