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I have Ubuntu 12.04 dual-booted with Windows 7, and I am using the Ubuntu boot loader. I'm sure many of you are familiar with the fact that after 10 seconds or so, it boots into the default partition. I would like to know if there is a way to disable this, so it will stay at the screen listing what partition you want until you choose one.

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up vote 2 down vote accepted

1. If you're using GRUB (GRand Unified Bootloader)

  1. Open the terminal and enter the following: sudo gedit /etc/default/grub

  2. Find the line GRUB_TIMEOUT=10 and change the value (in seconds) to the one you desire (if you want to disable the timeout, use -1)

  3. Save and close the file

  4. In the terminal, enter the following: sudo update-grub2

  5. Reboot and test

2. If you're using the newer BURG (Brand-new Universal loadeR from GRUB)

  1. Open the terminal and enter the following: sudo gedit /etc/default/burg

  2. Find the line GRUB_TIMEOUT=10 and change the value (in seconds) to the one you desire (you cannot completely disable the timeout though, so use a large number, like 600)

  3. Save and close the file

  4. In the terminal, enter the following: sudo update-burg

  5. Reboot and test

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Thanks, worked perfectly. It's a shame the -1 won't work on BURG, but I have GRUB regardless – WillumMaguire Oct 3 '12 at 0:12

As the root user open the file /etc/default/grub with your favorite text editor, locate the line containing GRUB_TIMEOUT= and change a numeric value to -1 (minus one). Then save the changes and run the command grub2-mkconfig

All should be set.

Other possible values are:

0 - do not wait at all;

positive number - amount of seconds to time out

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