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In my router I have this option:

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I know what is NAT, but what does it mean the bridge option here? and how the NAT is related to it? what is more secured enable or disabled or bridge?

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3 Answers 3

Missing information: device brand and model. My best guess at the moment:

Enable: device act as a router, external/WAN/ISP interface is connected to one subnet and internal/LAN interface to another. Outbound traffic from LAN to WAN is NATed behind external IP address.

Disable: device act as a router, external/WAN/ISP interface is connected to one subnet and internal/LAN interface to another. Outboud traffic from LAN to WAN is forwarded with original source IP address.

Bridge: device act as bridge/switch, and both external/WAN/ISP interface and internal/LAN interface(s) are on the same network (broadcast domain).

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Bridge, I assume, is used for IPX/SPX over TCP/IP and what not. Network Address Translation is for using an internal network with one of the set-aside private blocks like 192.168.x.x, as opposed to classical routing which is a can of worms we will not get into.

Just use NAT.

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