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I'm trying to install Intel HD Graphics XP driver on my Windows 7. Of course, for a reason (PAE Patch). I have downloaded the installer in both .exe and .zip formats but I couldn't run the installer even though I set Compatibility Mode to XP SP3. Here are the drivers available to download: http://downloadcenter.intel.com/SearchResult.aspx?lang=eng&ProductFamily=Graphics&ProductLine=Laptop+graphics+drivers&ProductProduct=2nd+Generation+Intel%C2%AE+Core%E2%84%A2+Processors+with+Intel%C2%AE+HD+Graphics+3000%2f2000

I also tried adding the driver manually in Device Manager but none of the .inf files were accepted.

The installer says: This computer does not meet the minimum requirements for installing the software.

Any suggestion?

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If it's designed for XP then it's not going to work on Win7, I doubt there's much you can do about it. –  Bali C Oct 19 '12 at 8:00
    
There seem to be drivers for Windows 7 as well on the same page. Have you tried them ? –  Praveen Oct 19 '12 at 8:05
    
I've been successful the other way round, but I don't think this is going to work... I don't get it why you downloaded the XP version, and not the Win7... –  ppeterka Oct 19 '12 at 8:15
    
You cannot install a Windows XP driver on Windows 7. –  Ramhound Oct 19 '12 at 13:51
    
I can. See my answer below. –  papaiatis Oct 27 '12 at 9:21
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2 Answers

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I have managed to install the XP driver by modifying the corresponding .inf file to enable the setup to run on newer version of Windows as well. And it works like a charm. I mean there is no Windows Areo anymore but that's not a problem for me.

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Like @Bali C already commented: it is not going to work, as the driver model since Windows Vista (UMDF) is completely different to the model used in Windows XP.

Vista laid the groundwork for a host of new technologies, all absolutely vital to pushing Windows into the 21st century. Vista’s new, modern driver architecture was designed to move core functionality from the kernel (where any instability can bring down the whole system) to user space—an absolutely necessary development.

[source]

That last line effectively describes the cause for the incompatibility.

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