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I have a old TP-Link Giga Router has 1:1 NAT Function, But does not have wifi.

So to have wifi, I have two options:

  1. Buy wifi access point and connect to my current router
  2. Get a wifi router with 1:1 NAT support. BUT I never found one.

My question is: Is there any wifi router with 1:1 NAT or these two simply cannot work together.

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Btw, I found almost all Routers have "Routing" function which setup Destination, Subnet Mask and Gateway. Can I use it for 1:1 NAT? –  Eric Yin Oct 20 '12 at 22:16
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What IP address do you have at your workstation? the public one or in the form 192.168.x.x.? How many computers/pda/other devices you are going to connect to the internet over WiFi? –  Serge Oct 20 '12 at 22:19
    
@Serge, IP address is 192.168.1.X from current wired router, I like to connect about 20 wifi computers on. –  Eric Yin Oct 21 '12 at 17:42
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Then by some WiFi access point if it save some money. I believe your current router is capable to handle many clients and that you misuse 1:1 related to the NAT in this case at least. –  Serge Oct 21 '12 at 17:47

1 Answer 1

If you are happy with the router, why not keep it and hand off the WiFi to a dedicated box?

I use an Edimax WiFi extender that cost around £30 in the UK. It is excellent. I have it set up with a fixed IP address on the same subnet as the main Internet router. It is also set to use the main router as it's gateway so that everything gets routed correctly and I've set aside an address range that the DHCP function of the WiFi extender controls rather than the main router. Works perfectly.

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You said "Extender", how can I extend it if I do not have wifi already? Or it can work along with a wired router. –  Eric Yin Oct 21 '12 at 17:41
    
Yes, it works both as an Extender, a hot spot and several other configurations. It has a wired connection so you can plug it straight into your router. –  Julian Knight Oct 22 '12 at 15:35

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