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With the d-link firmware I just connected the router and it worked, as is expected when using DHCP, but with dd-wrt I have no internet access.

It is configured with DHCP, and dd-wrt's wan status page reports that it is connected and that it has an ip address. Yet it is impossible to reach the internet.

If I disconnect the router and plugs the cable directly into my computer I get internet access, so it's obviously the dd-wrt software that isn't doing its job. However, I have no previous experience with the dd-wrt software and have no clue what to look for. I thought it would just work.

By the way, the power led is orange, the internet led is off, and wireless+lan1 is green. They all used to be green with the d-link firmware. Not sure if it's relevant, but now you know.

Does anyone have any idea what I should do to get internet access (besides reinstalling d-link's firmware)?

EDIT: It's a version B1. I read that it is very different from the A1 version, so I thought it may be relevant.

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I notice you don't mention the type internet connection (cable, etc) and if you are power cycling the modem when you switch from connecting it to the router and the computer. –  Bon Gart Oct 21 '12 at 18:58
    
@BonGart The internet connection is a Swisscom DSL I think, but my router is behind another router, so I'm basically just connecting to a regular DHCP network. As far as the modem goes I haven't touched it since it's working. I'm using it right now. –  Erik B Oct 21 '12 at 19:12
    
Had the same issue recently. DDWRT changed my router's MAC address to a different number, and it didn't play nicely with the ISP. Check the MAC address label on the router and compare it to the address in your DDWRT interface. If they aren't the same, look into spoofing your MAC address –  Callen L Jun 10 at 18:03

3 Answers 3

From what I've seen about dd-wrt, it's a "raw" distro. Meaning you have to configure stuff manually. The first step, after getting the external wan connection and setting up a DHCP, is configuring NAT.

I'm sure these guys know how to explain it better than me:

http://www.dd-wrt.com/wiki/index.php/Index:FAQ#Help.21_My_Internet_still_does_not_work.21

Read the docs. I'm sure it's all covered. After all, this is a distro -dedicated- to routing.

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As was mentioned in the earlier answer, the key here is manually setting up your internet connection in the router. The issue here is in how DSL modems work.

DSL modems typically have router firmware built into them. They tend to be hard coded to pass out a single internal IP address to a device that is connected to them. You typically see an address like 192.168.2.1 or something similar coming out of the DSL modem, as opposed to an external IP address like 69.172.43.86 or whatnot (I just created that randomly... I apologize to the holder of that address, whomever it may be... if anyone). What that means is if you check the IP address that is assigned to the computer connected to the DSL modem, it would be a Private Network address.

This means that when you connect a router to the DSL modem, you usually have to manually assign the gateway address of this Private Network to the router... if not also the internal IP address itself as well.

Otherwise, follow the link in the above answer, or use the DD-WRT Support site and follow their instructions for how to manually configure the router. You are essentially turning the router into a bridge... except you want the bridge to also handle DHCP.

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Having a router behind another router is a complex setup that very often won't "just work" with the default settings. For example, if the existing router uses the same LAN address range as the new router uses by default, the setup won't work.

The best thing to do is just to go over every single setting in the new router to make sure it's correct. Before you do that, look closely at how the existing router is configured so you will know what the correct setup is for the new router. For example, if the existing router has a LAN range of 192.168.1.0/24, the new router will not be able to use that range on its LAN side.

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