Take the 2-minute tour ×
Super User is a question and answer site for computer enthusiasts and power users. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am using Windows 7 on all wired desktops and wireless laptops in my home network. I recently upgraded my Ethernet switch to Gigabit and instantly noticed an increase in throughput in wired devices. I also bought a Wireless-N WAP but with degredation in wireless file transfer speeds.

I have been told that a number of reasons could affect wireless speeds including which WAP is used, how many wireless devices are connected, which security mode is used, etc. However, that remains irrelevant to my question.

Each of my laptops claim to support Wireless-N but I cannot seem to figure out how to determine if the laptops are truly running Wireless-N or are connected to the WAP through some sort of mixed-mode. I do not have control of the WAP device so cannot tell what mode it is running in.

Is there a way to tell which mode is being used and what the throughput is for each connected device without having access to the WAP interface?

share|improve this question
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I'm using Windows 8, but I believe the same thing should work for 7. It doesn't exactly tell you the protocol, but it tells you the current network speed.

  1. Open Network and Sharing Center
  2. Left-click on Wi-Fi connection
  3. Watch the "Speed" level for a while

Wi-Fi status window

I did it with my own, and it was usually pegged at 54.0 Mbps, indicating that it is working on 802.11g. If you see it get above 54 Mbps, you're using 802.11n, because 54 is as high as g goes.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Each of my laptops claim to support Wireless-N but I cannot seem to figure out how to determine if the laptops are truly running Wireless-N or are connected to the WAP through some sort of mixed-mode. I do not have control of the WAP device so cannot tell what mode it is running in.

The simplest way would be to set the access point to accept only Wireless-N clients.

share|improve this answer
    
He mentioned he does not have access to the access point interface. –  Ryan Oct 22 '12 at 23:14
    
Strange, you would have thought the protocol would be obviously displayed somewhere. –  Raheel Khan Oct 23 '12 at 7:40
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.