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I have a Dropbox account and want to store folders on two different drives, and have them both backed up etc by Dropbox. How can I do that?

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What operating system? Do you have a pro account? – Canadian Luke Oct 24 '12 at 16:56
    
Windows 7, I have a standard account. – drtanz Oct 24 '12 at 16:58

You can try to "cheat" the system by using Junction Points in NTFS.

  1. Install Dropbox, following the full setup including your account
  2. Exit Dropbox (right-click the icon in the system tray and click Exit)
  3. Open an Administrative Command Prompt (Start->type cmd->right-click the top entry and click Run as Administrator and select Yes)
  4. Type the following command: mklink /J %USERPROFILE%\Dropbox\Foldername X:\Foldername and press Enter
  5. Repeat the above command for any other folders, replacing the Foldername with the name you want to use, and X:\Foldername with the current folder
  6. Relaunch Dropbox

Junction points will basically make another pointer to the directory, usually transparent to most programs

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what's the difference here if I use the /H or /D parameters in mklink? Since I would like to do this for my localserver, I don't want the files copied from one folder to another every time, as there will be quite a number of reads/writes to be done. Basically the whole point of this is to move my XAMPP installation to an SSD rather than a normal drive where it used to reside alongside all the other folders I have in Dropbox. – drtanz Oct 24 '12 at 17:40
    
@drtanz With /J, it just creates a junction or pointer to that folder. Wikipedia has a full write-up on it if you follow the links – Canadian Luke Oct 24 '12 at 18:14

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