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I just installed Fedora 17 on my virtual Box. My host PC is a Windows 7 machine and connects to the internet Wirelessly. Could anyone tell me what network configurations should I use on my virtual fedora box so that I could be able to ping my host Windows 7 system and at the same time use the internet. I am currently using a bridged adapter setting with promiscous mode set to "Deny"

Update:

Edit: After considering a suggestion posted I now have only one network adapter configured in my virtual Fedora 17 drive which is NAT. My configuration is as follows

[raj@FedBox ~]$ ifconfig
lo: flags=73<UP,LOOPBACK,RUNNING>  mtu 16436
        inet 127.0.0.1  netmask 255.0.0.0
        inet6 ::1  prefixlen 128  scopeid 0x10<host>
        loop  txqueuelen 0  (Local Loopback)
        RX packets 0  bytes 0 (0.0 B)
        RX errors 0  dropped 0  overruns 0  frame 0
        TX packets 0  bytes 0 (0.0 B)
        TX errors 0  dropped 0 overruns 0  carrier 0  collisions 0

p2p1: flags=4163<UP,BROADCAST,RUNNING,MULTICAST>  mtu 1500
        inet 10.0.2.15  netmask 255.255.255.0  broadcast 10.0.2.255
        inet6 fe80::a00:27ff:fe05:d5a2  prefixlen 64  scopeid 0x20<link>
        ether 08:00:27:05:d5:a2  txqueuelen 1000  (Ethernet)
        RX packets 1890  bytes 1729820 (1.6 MiB)
        RX errors 0  dropped 0  overruns 0  frame 0
        TX packets 1616  bytes 197536 (192.9 KiB)
        TX errors 0  dropped 0 overruns 0  carrier 0  collisions 0

My windows host is called Raj-PC so when I attempt to ping it as such I get the following error

[raj@FedBox ~]$ ping Raj-PC
ping: unknown host Raj-PC

Any suggestion how to solve the problem ?

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migrated from serverfault.com Oct 25 '12 at 2:16

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Why are you using Bridged mode instead of just using the NAT'd networking environment provided by virtual box by default? –  mdpc Oct 24 '12 at 20:57
    
@mdpc I just updated the post –  Rajeshwar Oct 24 '12 at 21:11
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2 Answers

I had a similar problem when I installed windows XP on virtualBox (host was Ubuntu, but virtualBox is more or less exactly the same regardless of OS). I fixed the problem by installing the networking add on. If you haven't done that already, try that first. Also, I recommend you try pinging the host PC's IP address instead of name (I've always had troubles when pinging names, but IP's are [mostly] trouble free).

So try this tips to begin with. If still no luck, let me know and I'll see what other help I can provide. Good luck!

EDIT: Can you access the internet on Fedora?

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Yes I could. Internet works –  Rajeshwar Oct 25 '12 at 13:36
    
but you couldn't ping? I think it's just not finding Raj-PC (probably Raj-PC is local, so other PC's (i.e. VirtualBox) can't see it), so go command prompt on your host, and run ipconfig. Use the IP address that comes up to ping your host from Fedora –  Sylvester the Cat Oct 25 '12 at 22:50
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It is likely you can't use the host name to contact it because it is most probably not known by the DNS that answers your guest. Windows machine can know each others through some broadcast discovery, but GNU/Linux won't do that.

So, you must ping your host via its IP, either the NAT one or the external one (probably 192.168.x.x, reported by ipconfig on Windows). The NAT address would be, as the VirtualBox manual says in 9.11.1 : 10.0.2.2 (gateway if it's the first NAT VM). You can know it with this command (on the guest) :

netstat -rn | grep 'UG'

In a bridged, enterprise environement, you have a local DNS server that knows the name of all machines on its local network. Then you could use names to contact your host.

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