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Is there any software that can keep track of all changes that are made to the files in a specific folder? I'd like to keep track of the complete revision history of a specific folder (so that if I accidentally delete a file or folder, I can quickly restore it.)

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What OS are you talking about? –  user3463 Oct 28 '12 at 20:40
    
I think your question is too broad, and has too many factors to be considered to be helpful for other people. For instance, Apple has Time Machine, while Windows 7 and 8 have pretty good backup software also built in. If you can edit it to be more relevant to a particular situation, I think that'll stop it being closed. –  user3463 Oct 28 '12 at 20:44
    
@RandolphWest Which Windows backup software are you referring to, and how can you use it to automatically track changes to a folder? –  Anderson Green Oct 28 '12 at 20:53
    
There's also a program called dirMonitor - it looks like it might do what I want it to do. helpdeskgeek.com/free-tools-review/… –  Anderson Green Oct 28 '12 at 21:03
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If the purpose of this is to be able to restore a file that's accidentally deleted/overwritten, why not just use Windows 7's in-built Previous Versions? –  Ƭᴇcʜιᴇ007 Oct 28 '12 at 21:26

1 Answer 1

You could probably write up something yourself. .NET has a FileSystemWatcher class for that purpose. All you'd have to do is to make a backup after each event, I guess.

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Does git or SVN track changes to folders (and record all changes that are made by the user)? –  Anderson Green Oct 28 '12 at 20:57
    
Also, I'm not very familiar with .NET - I'm mainly a node.js developer. –  Anderson Green Oct 28 '12 at 20:58
    
With version control software like Subversion or git you have to explicitly commit changes you made. You could probably automate that but It kinda defies the purpose. –  Joey Oct 28 '12 at 20:58
    
How does it "defy the purpose"? –  Anderson Green Oct 28 '12 at 21:07
    
A VCS is supposed to store changes to a set of files in discrete steps, called revisions. Revisions have metadata that helps making sense of them, e.g. an author and a commit message. They are well-suited for things that a human splits into different revisions. What you want is actually at a granularity of individual file changes, e.g. every save action on a file should be versioned. This could mean plenty of revisions and you'd use it just as a data dump and that's not really what they are meant or built for, so don't expect them to do it well. –  Joey Oct 28 '12 at 21:24

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