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Everytime I boot up a virtual machine using VMwarePlayer/VMwareWorkstation, it creates tons of multiple splits/parts of the same disk (I guess?) in the specific folder, none of them bigger than 320kb, but some with only 1kb, others with 20kb. In the end, I have a folder completely messed like this:

Windows Server 2008 R2 x64-s053 -- Vmware virtual disk file -- 320kb
Windows Server 2008 R2 x64-s054 -- Vmware virtual disk file -- 310kb
Windows Server 2008 R2 x64-s055 -- Vmware virtual disk file -- 320kb
Windows Server 2008 R2 x64-s056 -- Vmware virtual disk file -- 54kb
Windows Server 2008 R2 x64-s057 -- Vmware virtual disk file -- 320kb
Windows Server 2008 R2 x64-s058 -- Vmware virtual disk file -- 2kb
Windows Server 2008 R2 x64-s059 -- Vmware virtual disk file -- 320kb

They aren't snapshots/backup (I never created one). By this specific machine, I have now 112 parts. Everytime I boot up the machine, there are like 20 new parts created. What's exactly going on here?

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1 Answer 1

When you created the new disk to choose the option to do this, either by accepting the defaults, or by manually configuring the disk storage with "Create new virtual disk" and "Split virtual disk in multiple files" and no: "allocate all space now"

  • If you select "Store disk as a single file" you will only get one .vmdk file per virtual disk.
  • If you select "Split disk into multiple files" you will end up with lots of (easier to backup) files.

If you do not select "allocate all disk space now" than vmware will start with small disk file(s) and grow the files backing the virtual disk as needed.

enter image description here

Everytime I boot up the machine, there are like 20 new parts created.

Now that is just weird. The windows version creates all part at VM creation.

(I never tested vmware with disk parts on unix. I tend to use one disk and preallocate all space for performance reasons.)

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