Take the 2-minute tour ×
Super User is a question and answer site for computer enthusiasts and power users. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I want to use a high quality gaming mouse on a linux machine for a special application. I need high DPI and no angle snapping or acceleration in the mouse sensor. I am reading mouse data directly from /dev/input/event*.

I am looking at buying a Logitech G9X. According to my web searches angle snapping will be disabled by default but it will not be able to achieve full DPI out of the box.

Can anyone tell me without having to buy one: if I set it up the way I want on my Win7 machine with SetPoint, will it retain those settings when I plug it in as a simple USB mouse on Linux? Thanks!

share|improve this question
add comment

1 Answer

up vote 0 down vote accepted

No. I recently moved my Logitech MX Performance from Windows to Linux and it was all defaults. All the settings are stored in software in Setpoint. There is no official Linux support, which is why you can't get full DPI (or any DPI setting other than the default).

Acceleration can be configured in the standard Linux ways, but any special Logitech specific stuff will be permanently defaults.


Edit: I found some code to manually set the DPI.

https://github.com/joelpet/logitech-mx-performance-dpi

You'll have to compile the code yourself, but it isn't that bad. Download the zip, run 'make' in the directory where you extract it. If it complains about libusb you will have to install that library. In Ubuntu:

sudo apt-get install libusb-1.0-0-dev

After the binary is compiled run it with:

sudo ./performance_mx_dpi 16

Where 16 is the sensitivity from 1 (lowest) to 16 (max).

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks very much! What a useless mouse. :) –  Tom Nov 12 '12 at 3:21
    
I agree. It's very frustrating that they didn't simply store the settings in the mouse. –  DaleSwanson Nov 12 '12 at 3:25
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.