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I'm using MS Word 2011 on Mac OS X but I assume that it's got very similar functionality to its Windows counterpart.

If I delete a word in MS Word (using ctrl-delete on Windows, and cmd-delete on Mac), then MS Word typically deletes the space preceding that word, as well.

How can I stop MS Word from doing this? I'm not used to this so I rarely re-add the space myself, since MS Word is the only application to do this.

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Unless I'm misunderstanding, can't you put the cursor right next to the word? If you hold CTRL and press the left/right arrows, you can jump words and the cursor is positioned after the space, so it's retained when you press CTRL + DEL.

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That's not my experience. I'm trying it out now (MS Word 2011 on OS X) and regardless of if I jump left or right (by one word), then the cursor is always positioned to the right of a space and to the left of a non-space character. –  Gary Nov 29 '12 at 21:09
    
I think I've misunderstood, but that's what it should do. If you then press CTRL + DEL, doesn't that remove the word, but still keep the space preceding it so that there's a space after the previous word? –  keyboardP Nov 29 '12 at 21:25
    
Ah, yes. Sorry for the confusion. When I made my last comment, Word was working as it should. However, when I made the original post, the preceding space was getting deleted. I've had this experience before where Word sometimes deletes the space. How can I at the very least make this behavior consistent? –  Gary Nov 30 '12 at 6:59
    
Sorry, not sure about that, I can't seem to replicate it. Might have something to do with the way the document itself is formatted. –  keyboardP Nov 30 '12 at 15:29
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