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If you run server services in your computer, it is very easy to configure the same computer to use it: just point the client to localhost.

Now the gateway often runs your DHCP, DNS, proxy, firewall, QoS, and uPNP services, it should be just as easy to configure everyone to pointing the client to gateway, especially when the IP is dynamic.

  • In particular, all router manuals would just begin with "Type http://gateway/ on your browser." Simple.

Why is the gateway not called 'gateway'?

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closed as not constructive by Baarn, 8088, Nifle, HackToHell, Simon Sheehan Dec 8 '12 at 18:14

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I don't think this question is constructive. Why don't you simply add this to your local DNS? What if you happen to have more than one gateway? What if your DNS is on one Server and the Firewall and NAT on another one? –  Baarn Dec 8 '12 at 8:35
    
"Gateway" is an administrative term, not a technical one. "Gateway" mean different things for different people. –  BatchyX Dec 8 '12 at 10:43

2 Answers 2

The question is really speculative so any answer will be equally so but I'll play. My take is that localhost is always a fixed address whereas a similar gateway record is not. Additionally, one can have multiple gateways active at one time depending on the destination for a particular communication.

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One may have multiple gateway for the same destination too. –  BatchyX Dec 8 '12 at 10:41

By the time the idea came out that typical home networks would have a gateway router that was configurable by HTTP, it was too late to get any such standard into end systems. Routers could implement this themselves, and some do implement something similar in their DNS relay agents.

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