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Lotus Notes clients can edit and save received emails. How do I restrict them so they are not able to edit and save received emails?

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1 Answer 1

Sorry, but there is no way to do this in Lotus Notes -- not without custom programming, and not without breaking other Notes features.

The programming would be to apply an Authors field to all incoming messages and leave the recipient's named out of it. With that in place, you could change the ACL so that the user has only 'Author' permission (with the extra 'create documents' permission checked to make sure the user has the ability to send messages) instead of the more usual 'Editor' permission. But things would break because Notes updates hidden items in messages when users do things -- e.g, setting a flag for follow-up, and those updates would fail. I can't think of other features that would fail off the top of my head, but I'm sure there are more. The error message the user receives when things fail would probably be very confusing, too.

If what you really need to do is to make sure that a copy of unaltered original messages is kept, then you need to investigate the 'email journaling' feature of the Lotus Domino server. (Discussion of that would be more suitable on ServerFault rather than SuperUser.)

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+1 for mail journalling, it's easy to set up. In theory if you're using certificates then messages are digital signed. So you would know if the message has been tampered with. But as with anything in the user space, this can be disabled. –  booyaa Dec 20 '12 at 9:13
    
Not sure why you consider journaling to be in 'user space'. It's managed through server-based mail ruless. –  rhsatrhs Dec 20 '12 at 10:42
    
You misread my comment, try again. –  booyaa Dec 20 '12 at 12:11
    
Ah. Right... Journaling does not sign messages. It does have the option to place them in an encrypted database such that only people who have the key could get at them to alter them, but it does not sign them. For that, you would need to go to a 3rd party journaling/archiving solution. –  rhsatrhs Dec 20 '12 at 15:58

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