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If a user individually granted one set of rights to a folder but a different set of rights is granted to a group to which he belongs, which takes precedence?

I originally thought that the lower rights would take precedence. Now I am thinking that it is the higher set of rights but Deny will take priority over a grant.

How does this work?

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up vote 4 down vote accepted

In my admittedly limited and not rigorously tested experience, a user is granted the union of user and group rights minus the deny parts.

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That is my also admittedly limited and not rigorously tested experience. Thanks! – Chad Dec 21 '12 at 15:26
    
This is correct. A permit in any set is enough to allow access, A deny in any set is enough to forbid access. – David Dec 21 '12 at 16:39
    
Thanks to all!! – Chad Dec 21 '12 at 17:07

I created a folder with r-x for user, -w- for group, and --- for other.

I can browse the folder but not modify.

So it looks like user rights override group rights.

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That could also mean that the lower of the two rights are applied. For example, if the group was given read access but the individual write access, what happens? – Chad Dec 21 '12 at 15:38
    
Changing folder to -wx for user and r-- for group allows me to create and edit files but I cant list files. Looks like user rights are still applied. – Ray Cathode Dec 21 '12 at 18:58
    
Are you talking about Linux? – Harry Johnston Dec 23 '12 at 0:09
    
whoops!! Sorry about that! – Ray Cathode Dec 28 '12 at 6:01

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