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Do you really need a license to develop Windows 8 metro apps? Even for third party ones not intended to be included in the Windows 8 store?

I thought the Metro was the future, and I understand why Microsoft would want to moderate what gets added to their store, but if you can't even post apps to third party sites then it doesn't seem all that great.

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I think the term that is used is Walled Garden. I could be mistaken. I haven't looked that closely into it. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Walled_garden_(technology) <-- often the trailing ) will be cut off in the link so please be sure it's there. –  Mark Allen Dec 27 '12 at 4:46
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you need license to start using Visual Studio. –  Sathya Dec 27 '12 at 6:31
    
@Sathya Wouldn't user of Visual Studio Express series only need license for their Windows installation? –  Martheen Cahya Paulo Dec 27 '12 at 10:02
    
In short: To develop app - you need a License (its free). But To Let the users Run your app - There are 2 ways: either buy a Windows Store licence (Paid), or On every machine you will need a licence free developer licence. There is no other way of Side-Loading apps in Windows 8 till now. –  Lamb Dec 27 '12 at 11:56
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Do you really need a license to develop Windows 8 metro apps?

Windows Store app development > New to Windows Store apps? Start here > Show me

This mentions Run Visual Studio to get a developer license. and mentions To develop and test Windows Store apps, you need a developer license, which is free.

You can create this license when you start VS or there is also another way to get this license.

So, yes, you need a (free) license; I don't think it completely stops you from developing applications.

Even for third party ones not intended to be included in the Windows 8 store?

Yes, Metro apps are "Windows Store apps" and thus need the developer license in order to be made.

I thought the Metro was the future, and I understand why Microsoft would want to moderate what gets added to their store, but if you can't even post apps to third party sites then it doesn't seem all that great.

Yeah, that's the purpose of the store, being in control over what applications can and can't run. Compared to that, the internet is an unmoderated place which doesn't live up to the same expectations an application in the Windows 8 Store would.

A program that crashes, perform sluggish or do other stuff you might not want would not be able to enter Windows 8 Store; but can reach your computer if you download it from the web. I think you can share executables, but you really will not want to; you could just use the Windows 8 Store instead.

There hasn't really been a case of people being really denied from the Windows 8 Store; apart from some developers in the early days being unable to submit their applications for unclear reasons, which has since been approved so it shouldn't really form a problem nowadays...

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When the OP mentions "sharing over the internet" then business is far-fetched, how many more off-topic comments are you going to place? –  Tom Wijsman Dec 27 '12 at 15:47
    
Fine... should I post a new question asking how does one distribute / deploy winRT apps intended for private use that is not internal to a single company or will I just get the same replies? –  TimothyP Dec 27 '12 at 16:22
    
My comment was on "but you really will not want to" , how do you know? Do you fully understand his situation from the small question? Is it really that offensive if someone tries to dig a little deeper, I have nearly the same questions as the OP, so I thought I'd expand on that and get more feedback. Did not expect to hit the taboo wall. –  TimothyP Dec 27 '12 at 16:34
    
@TimothyP: Talking about business on Super User is indeed a taboo. :) –  Tom Wijsman Dec 27 '12 at 16:54
    
I will post my own slightly modified version of the question, please do not bother to reply to it... your view on the subject has already been noted –  TimothyP Dec 27 '12 at 17:12
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You can deploy Metro app directly for internal usage but it would require special license for the PCs themselves. It seems Microsoft is trying to go all-walled-garden style with Metro, while still letting the Desktop wide open for anything you want. And really, the only reason you wouldn't want your app to enter the Store would be if it's for internal usage, which is supported by the enterprise route for Metro.

If your app is for general public consumption, paying measly 100 bucks for free publishing, distribution, license management etc for a year is much much better than any third party store. Compare this with Android where technically you can publish your app in any store, yet Google Play still dominate the market (even with third party store from OEMs and operators)

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You are completely wrong when you say the only reason would be for internal use... check my blog post for just one possible use case where it is neither internal nor intended for the public... and we have many such use cases. What you mentioned above is what Microsoft (and I love Microsoft, I'm not a hater, I've been developing using their tools for over 15 years now) wants us to believe –  TimothyP Dec 27 '12 at 14:22
    
Link to the blog post? –  Martheen Cahya Paulo Jan 2 '13 at 2:02
    
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