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My new computer with Windows 8 Pro occasionally shows BSOD with sad smile, but only during cold boot.

CPU: i7-3770
MB: ASUS P8B75-M BIOS v.1002
MEM: 32GB (4x8Gb) Geil

After the system has loaded, it seems stable and does not fail even under high workload. I observed BSOD only during cold boots (not after restart) and all with different error codes.

Any ideas?

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Even if all error codes are different. Can you collect at least some of them? Maybe they are helpful. Its only a thought. –  nixda Jan 1 '13 at 11:22
    
upload the dumps, so that we can look at them with WinDbg –  magicandre1981 Jan 1 '13 at 15:23
    
Have not found how to upload the files here, so please use this link: mediafire.com/?249b93ict7yhggw –  Fedor Jan 2 '13 at 7:46
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4 Answers

'cold' boot on windows 8 MAY mean hybrid booting - with restarts being an old school 'proper' boot. Intermittant errors such as this can be a pain to replicate, but you might want to try creating a batch file that runs shutdown /full to do a proper cold boot.

If that helps, try turning off fast boot completely in the power settings - this may need UAC previledge elevation

enter image description here

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Thanks, I have turned 'fast start-up' off. A couple of times the computer booted up without errors (shutdown /s). I will see whether the problem went away and let you know. Is it possible to determine from event logs whether previous BSOD were only after fast start-up? –  Fedor Jan 1 '13 at 18:09
    
Offhand, I'd try the usual error checking tools - whocrashed and bluescreenview to see what's causing it. As far as I know, bluescreens are stored in c:/minidump, not logged since they're too sudden to log in event log –  Journeyman Geek Jan 1 '13 at 23:12
    
Have not found how to upload the files here, so please use this link: mediafire.com/?249b93ict7yhggw –  Fedor Jan 2 '13 at 7:47
    
You can use nirsoft.net/utils/blue_screen_view.html#DownloadLinks to work out what's going on. quite a few of these errors seem to be memory related (or driver related) so, I'd suggest running memtest x86+ to rule out memory. Other than that I'm running a blank. –  Journeyman Geek Jan 2 '13 at 8:06
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You should run chkdsk /F and memtest86+ to test your HDD and RAM becasue you get NTFS and memory related crashes:

*******************************************************************************
*                                                                             *
*                        Bugcheck Analysis                                    *
*                                                                             *
*******************************************************************************

BAD_POOL_CALLER (c2)
The current thread is making a bad pool request.  Typically this is at a bad IRQL level or double freeing the same allocation, etc.
Arguments:
Arg1: 0000000000000007, Attempt to free pool which was already freed
Arg2: 00000000000011c1, (reserved)
Arg3: 0000000000000000, Memory contents of the pool block
Arg4: fffff8a0042bf140, Address of the block of pool being deallocated

Debugging Details:
------------------

nt!KeBugCheckEx
nt!ExFreePool
Ntfs!ExFreeToNPagedLookasideList
Ntfs!NtfsDeleteScb
Ntfs!NtfsRemoveScb
Ntfs!NtfsPrepareFcbForRemoval
Ntfs!NtfsTeardownStructures
Ntfs!NtfsDecrementCloseCounts
Ntfs!NtfsCommonClose
Ntfs!NtfsFspClose
nt!ExpWorkerThread
nt!PspSystemThreadStartup
nt!KiStartSystemThread


*******************************************************************************
*                                                                             *
*                        Bugcheck Analysis                                    *
*                                                                             *
*******************************************************************************

BAD_POOL_CALLER (c2)
The current thread is making a bad pool request.  Typically this is at a bad IRQL level or double freeing the same allocation, etc.
Arguments:
Arg1: 000000000000000d, type of pool violation the caller is guilty of.
Arg2: fffff8a004a64010
Arg3: 0000000074536d4d
Arg4: 75fd8076fbe84b3b

Debugging Details:
------------------


FAULTING_IP: 
nt!MiDeleteEmptySubsections+111
fffff800`2923d821 488d3558272900  lea     rsi,[nt!MmDeleteSubsectionList (fffff800`294cff80)]


STACK_TEXT:  
nt!KeBugCheckEx
nt!ExFreePool
nt!MiDeleteEmptySubsections
nt!MiDereferenceSegmentThread
nt!PspSystemThreadStartup
nt!KiStartSystemThread


SYMBOL_NAME:  nt!MiDeleteEmptySubsections+111

IMAGE_NAME:  memory_corruption



*******************************************************************************
*                                                                             *
*                        Bugcheck Analysis                                    *
*                                                                             *
*******************************************************************************

KERNEL_SECURITY_CHECK_FAILURE (139)
A kernel component has corrupted a critical data structure.  The corruption
could potentially allow a malicious user to gain control of this machine.
Arguments:
Arg1: 0000000000000003, A LIST_ENTRY has been corrupted (i.e. double remove).
Arg2: fffff88016ffe460, Address of the trap frame for the exception that caused the bugcheck
Arg3: fffff88016ffe3b8, Address of the exception record for the exception that caused the bugcheck
Arg4: 0000000000000000, Reserved

Debugging Details:
------------------

nt!KeBugCheckEx
nt!KiBugCheckDispatch
nt!KiFastFailDispatch
nt!KiRaiseSecurityCheckFailure
WdFilter! ?? ::NNGAKEGL::`string'
fltmgr!DoFreeContext
fltmgr!DoReleaseContext
fltmgr!FltpDeleteContextList
fltmgr!CleanupStreamListCtrl
fltmgr!DeleteStreamListCtrlCallback
nt!FsRtlTeardownPerStreamContexts
Ntfs!NtfsDeleteScb
Ntfs!NtfsRemoveScb
Ntfs!NtfsPrepareFcbForRemoval
Ntfs!NtfsTeardownStructures
Ntfs!NtfsDecrementCloseCounts
Ntfs!NtfsCommonClose
Ntfs!NtfsFspClose
nt!ExpWorkerThread
nt!PspSystemThreadStartup
nt!KiStartSystemThread


NTFS_FILE_SYSTEM (24)
    If you see NtfsExceptionFilter on the stack then the 2nd and 3rd
    parameters are the exception record and context record. Do a .cxr
    on the 3rd parameter and then kb to obtain a more informative stack
    trace.
Arguments:
Arg1: 000000b50019060b
Arg2: fffff88002bab548
Arg3: fffff88002baad80
Arg4: fffff880017e52f5

Debugging Details:
------------------

Ntfs! ?? ::NNGAKEGL::`string'
Ntfs!NtfsDeleteFcb
Ntfs!NtfsTeardownFromLcb
Ntfs!NtfsTeardownStructures
Ntfs!NtfsDecrementCloseCounts
Ntfs!NtfsCommonClose
Ntfs!NtfsFspClose
nt!ExpWorkerThread
nt!PspSystemThreadStartup
nt!KiStartSystemThread


IRQL_NOT_LESS_OR_EQUAL (a)
An attempt was made to access a pageable (or completely invalid) address at an
interrupt request level (IRQL) that is too high.  This is usually
caused by drivers using improper addresses.
If a kernel debugger is available get the stack backtrace.
Arguments:
Arg1: fffff6fc50185e98, memory referenced
Arg2: 0000000000000000, IRQL
Arg3: 0000000000000000, bitfield :
    bit 0 : value 0 = read operation, 1 = write operation
    bit 3 : value 0 = not an execute operation, 1 = execute operation (only on chips which support this level of status)
Arg4: fffff800a2b98353, address which referenced memory

Debugging Details:
------------------
nt!KeBugCheckEx
nt!KiBugCheckDispatch
nt!KiPageFault
nt!MiCaptureAndResetWorkingSetAccessBits
nt!MiTrimOrAgeWorkingSet
nt!MiProcessWorkingSets
nt!MmWorkingSetManager
nt!KeBalanceSetManager
nt!PspSystemThreadStartup
nt!KiStartSystemThread

IMAGE_NAME:  memory_corruption

BUCKET_ID_FUNC_OFFSET:  d3

FAILURE_BUCKET_ID:  AV_nt!MiCaptureAndResetWorkingSetAccessBits
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Already done, see my own answer below. –  Fedor Jan 4 '13 at 19:35
    
remove the RAM, because it shows errors. Also run chkdsk. –  magicandre1981 Jan 4 '13 at 22:33
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There are 3 tools to help you track down BSODs:

To 2 most common causes of a BSOD are:

  • Bad RAM
    • Run Memtest86+, as suggested by others, to check
  • Bad Driver
    • Use the 3 tools I mentioned above to narrow down the search
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up vote 0 down vote accepted

Following the advice to run memtest x86+, I downloaded it, burnt boot-CD, and launched it. Two full passes took almost 12 hours and found no errors, which is great: http://i.stack.imgur.com/qY9cm.jpg

Still I decided to launch memtest once more after the computer is off for some time immediately after power-on. And the errors appeared in the first simplest tests: http://i.stack.imgur.com/lxyU3.jpg

This quite perplexes me. I even tried to turn off fast start-up in BIOS and to increase the delay after POST to 10 seconds, thinking that it might be due to initialization of some hardware, but without any success. Soon after power-on, memtest still finds few errors and then the system becomes absolutely stable.

It does seem to be my memory since changing memory modules does help me. It is necessary to check the qualified list of modules from M/B producer, and using the recommended ram.

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Great to see you found an answer. You probably could have gotten an answer for your other 'answer' had that been posted as a comment to the appropriate answer - I didn't notice this till someone upvoted my other answer. It does compliment this answer (and you should always post one complete answer, and edit, rather than multipost as you would do in a forum), so I have taken the liberty of editing them together, and flagging the other post to delete. Feel free to add anything you feel may be necessary to create a more complete answer. –  Journeyman Geek Mar 23 '13 at 3:25
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