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This may seem like a insane question, but is there a thing in Fedora 16/17 which delete .jpg images from /tmp/ ?

I had 4GB of pictures stored in /tmp/download which are all gone now. The folder structure is still there, but all the folders are empty.

And the insane thing is that this is the second time this happens to me. Both times from /tmp/download.

My filesystem seems to be fine(Running raid-1) and there are no other missing files at all.

So is it me who deleted the files and forgot, or is it Fedora.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

There is a cleanup job in /etc/cron.daily/tmpwatch that will nuke files that haven't been accessed in a while (30 days by default).

man 8 tmpwatch might yield some more insight

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Moreover, it's generally a bad habit to store valuable stuff under /tmp. I've seen systems set up with /tmp backed by tmpfs (e.g. ephemeral, swap-backed, nothing survives reboot...) –  haimg Jan 2 '13 at 17:25
    
That is it i guess. –  MTilsted Jan 3 '13 at 14:54
    
And just in case anyone cares. Fedora 18 will also clear /tmp/ on reboot, so I better get out of my habit of using /tmp for anything. –  MTilsted Jan 4 '13 at 17:05
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From Fedora 18 on, /tmp is mounted on tmpfs (i.e. RAM) by default, and thus erased on power off.

This behaviour can be disabled by issuing systemctl mask tmp.mount and reboot (and reenabled by issuing systemctl unmask tmp.mount and reboot), and then /tmp will be mounted on the / filesystem and can be controlled by /usr/lib/tmpfiles.d/tmp.conf settings.

See http://fedoraproject.org/wiki/Features/tmp-on-tmpfs and man tmpfiles.d for more details on each case.

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