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I am looking to purchase a wireless router for my modem. Something like this:

http://www.futureshop.ca/en-CA/product/d-link-d-link-dir-601-wireless-n-150-router-dir-601/10134592.aspx?path=8350c80b2e98ba0c093494858abcf4dfen02

Now the question is this: It says that we need to run some kind of a cd to set it up. Suppose I put the cd in my laptop and set it up. But hey...after the initial setup, do I still need to keep my laptop running? Because I just want to connect my iPhone and not have the laptop at all. Just my iPhone and maybe an iPad or a BB.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

It's just for the initial setup, and that's all. After you establish your SSID (what name your wireless network appears to others searching for wireless) and security/passphrase (do NOT go without WPA/WPA2 with passphrase), you're set to go with your wifi-enabled devices. If it asks you, look for a minimum of 802.11g, preferably g+n. If that doesn't come up, ignore what I just said about it.
Your wizard that the disc provides will likely walk you through all this.

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No , you only need a laptop or desktop connected via Ethernet cord for the set up . Although I advise you to keep a laptop within reach( as in you can call a friend and he can bring his over) in case you need to reset the router( or change your password)

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In most (all?) cases, the CD is just for configuring the router (which may also be done through a web-based administration page), and configuring your computer to access the router (which may also be done manually).

In other words, you don't need the CD, and most certainly, you do NOT need to keep your computer running in order to use your router from other devices.

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