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I've moved an old Slackware 11 installation from a physical PC to a virtualized in ESXi.

Everything seems to work fine except for one rule in iptables, namely the row:

iptables -t filter -I INPUT -m state --state ESTABLISHED,RELATED -j ACCEPT

The return from iptables is: iptables: Unknown error 4294967295

My googling only leads me to problems when using openVZ.

Full config

#! /bin/sh
/usr/sbin/iptables --flush

# drop all
/usr/sbin/iptables -t filter -I INPUT -j REJECT

# permit established connections and related stuff
iptables -t filter -I INPUT -m state --state ESTABLISHED,RELATED -j ACCEPT

# permit all traffic on loopback interface
/usr/sbin/iptables -t filter -I INPUT -i lo -j ACCEPT

# permit ICMP from everywere
/usr/sbin/iptables -t filter -I INPUT -p icmp -j ACCEPT

# permit all traffic from selected hosts
/usr/sbin/iptables -t filter -I INPUT --src HOST.A/32 -j ACCEPT
/usr/sbin/iptables -t filter -I INPUT --src NET.B/25 -j ACCEPT

# permit HTTP & HTTPS traffic from everywhere
/usr/sbin/iptables -t filter -I INPUT -p tcp --dport 80 -j ACCEPT
/usr/sbin/iptables -t filter -I INPUT -p tcp --dport 443 -j ACCEPT

# MySQL
/usr/sbin/iptables -t filter -I INPUT -p tcp --dport 3306 -j ACCEPT

# FTP
/usr/sbin/iptables -t filter -I INPUT -p tcp --dport 21 -j ACCEPT
/usr/sbin/iptables -t filter -I INPUT -p tcp --dport 10500:10550 -j ACCEPT

Any thoughs?

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Googling I found that the following modules must be installed or built into the kernel for iptables to work, make sure you have them.

ipt_MASQUERADE   
ipt_helper   
ipt_REDIRECT   
ipt_state   
ipt_TCPMSS   
ipt_LOG    
ipt_TOS    
tun   
iptable_nat
ipt_length
ipt_tcpmss
iptable_mangle
ipt_limit
ipt_tos 
iptable_filter
ipt_helper
ipt_tos 
ipt_ttl 
ipt_REJECT

Use lsmod | less to see the installed modules; if you have build them into the kernel, inspect your kernel config instead.

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