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Internal hard disk beeping then partition disappears

I posted the problem here: Internal hard disk beeping then partition disappears . Since then I had moved my PC to another place, got fitted another new hard disk (problematic one is still there) and brought it back and for the last 3 days I'm using the PC without any issues.

It now shows no problem with the disk, but there was indeed problem. Everyone suggested upcoming drive failure....

At this momoment I can't send it under warranty since unless vendors(Seagate here) visibly see the problem, they won't look into it.

So I'm confused whether the drive has completely recovered or it's going to die sooner or later.

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marked as duplicate by Dave M, BBlake, 8088, Kyle Jones, Dennis Jan 4 '13 at 18:24

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We cannot answer this question. The best advice we can give is to duplicate the drive and send it to Seagate for warrenty replacement –  Ramhound Jan 4 '13 at 16:08
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@Ramhound is correct. You may have reseated the connection by picking up the computer and moving it. This may have bumped a tolerance in the HD back into spec. Or this may just be the calm before the storm. Backup the HD NOW ! Then send it in. –  Everett Jan 4 '13 at 16:10
    
It might be better to update teh original post to make it easier for those reading this –  Dave M Jan 4 '13 at 17:00
    
If I send it now, will Seagate be able to see that it did give problem earlier? I guess before their eyes the problem should be visible else they won't replace it. –  AgA Jan 5 '13 at 6:51
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1 Answer

up vote 0 down vote accepted

like @Everett said: BACKUP NOW. but backup TWICE!

The question to ask yourself is : can you take the chance having the HD die on you?

At all time, critical data should be on at least 2 different backups, one close to the working pc/laptop, and one remote from it, in addition to your main location (ie, the working laptop/pc).

As the "local" copies (the working PC, and its local backup) could both fail at same time (ex: if flood/theft occurs).

That way, in case 1 or 2 of the copies fail (ie: you get robbed of your pc + the local external hd containing backups) : you'll have at least 1 other to recover from and quickly get back to the "safe" (well, safer) total amount of "2 backups media + 1 working media" at 3 (2 local, 1 remote).

Ask yourself: "what if i don't? What if I could lose all its content? Is it worth it?" (The answer to that could be "yes", but it heavily depends on the content. I assume in most cases the answer is "no, I prefer to spend money on 2 external (1 local, 1 remote) backup than losing it all")

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and yes, it IS going to die sooner or later (all your HD and CD and whatever will, too. When saving to backups, check regularly if you can still read them, and backup again to a newer media if not. And rememeber also that technology changes: could you still recover in 20 years something stored in a HD or CD you saved to? (in addition to the fact that CD/HDD/DVD/tapes don't last forever too... a few years can be enough to make them unreadable) –  Olivier Dulac Jan 4 '13 at 16:55
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