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How to find out total running time of system and hard disk?

I do not want the uptime but the total number of hours it has been running.

Is there any way to see this ?

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marked as duplicate by HackToHell, Indrek, RedGrittyBrick, haimg, Karan Jan 6 '13 at 21:52

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up vote 4 down vote accepted

I think you can get this indirectly - with caveats - using S.M.A.R.T.

For example (I'll use linux here because of cli, but you there would be equivalents in other OSs):

$ sudo smartctl -A /dev/sda | grep Power_On_Hours
9 Power_On_Hours          0x0032   092   092   000    Old_age   Always - 6264

The last value is the accumulated number of hours (or minutes depending on manufacturer) the disk has been powered up. So obviously the caveats are that this should be the system drive (as this is least likely to sleep while the machine is powered up) and the same system drive the PC has always had.

If you swap the main drive, you just need to keep a log of the hours on the previous one.

So the thinking here is that the system drive should be powered up whenever the PC is, and so tells you the total run time.

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I'd guess that one of the smart frontends might work here - I believe gsmartctrl comes with one such option –  Journeyman Geek Jan 6 '13 at 8:56

No, computers do not have odometers.

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1  
Technically, an odometer measures distance, not time. –  Indrek Jan 6 '13 at 9:01
    
I was looking for workarounds to find the total time run. –  HackToHell Jan 6 '13 at 9:26
    
@Indrek: Yes, I know that, but I think it's a good analogy for what was being asked for. –  paradroid Jan 6 '13 at 9:29

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