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I have public ip address (for example 77.77.77.222). When somebody type /who on irc channel he sees:
Linkas@77.77.77.222
How can I hide under a domain? For example Linkas@mydomain.tk

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2 Answers

Depending on the network you're connecting to, there are many ways to do this.

Usermodes

Some networks have a usermode +x, which will mask your IP address. It requires you to have a registered account, on most networks. Once you've identified, you can do:

/mode YourNick +x

vhosts /Cloaks

Some networks have the option to enable vhosts or cloaks. Enabling vhost will turn

Linkas@77.77.77.222 to Linkas@some.vhost.here

Basically a Vhost a string of letters and numbers, with periods instead of spaces. Many networks have HostServ services, and enabling your vhost is really easy. Once you've identified, you can request a vhost:

/msg hostserv request vhost.goes.here

Some networks like freenode provide users with cloaks. It's used to show affiliation (or lack thereof) to a particular group or project, but it also masks your IP as a side-effect. To get a cloak, you can join the #help channel for that network, and request a cloak there.

*Tor *

Some networks allow access via Tor. The instructions for setting up Tor on freenode network can be found in the links given below:

Tor Setup

About Tor

I hope this helps :)

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The easiest way would be using bouncer/BNC. In short the bouncer connects to the server for you. There are many advantage beside hiding the IP. Please read instructions in bouncer as the usage may varies.

Here is a list of bouncer.

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ok but I guess like web proxies, it's one thing having the software to run the proxy, but it's another to have it on a computer with a different ip. in one case you run the server yourself(if you have a computer with another ip to use), in another case you use somebody else's BNC. Do you have any info on who offers BNCs free for use? –  barlop May 23 '13 at 8:39
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