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I have an MP3 stream I want to schedule a recording of. I can do it using wget to a file, its just a straight mp3 stream. However I'd like to use a command line stream ripper that will do a better job. Any one know of one?

Update 1

WGET is grabbing whatever part of the stream it comes in on. This may not really be the start of a frame in the MP3 file. Also, wget is not really schedule ready. I experimented with starting it with a cron job, then killing it later, this produced a file that didn't really start and stop where I wanted.

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What's a "better job"? wget will give you a perfect bit-for-bit duplicate of the original file. In what sense should the replacement be "better"? –  CarlF Oct 9 '09 at 15:18
    
WGET is grabbing whatever part of the stream it comes in on. This may not really be the start of a frame in the MP3 file. Also, wget is not really schedule ready. I experimented with starting it with a cron job, then killing it later, this produced a file that didn't really start and stop where I wanted. –  Anthony D Oct 9 '09 at 16:22
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3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can use cron to kick off VLC at a specified interval, and instruct it to do only a partial extract. Something like:

vlc --start-time=0 --stop-time=60.0

That will start it at 0s in the stream (you could probably leave it out), then stop after 60 seconds. You would need other options to specify your input stream and output file.

See the Wiki Command Line page for additional options.

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I am a fan of VLC anyway... –  Anthony D Oct 9 '09 at 19:47
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You might want to check out the -dumpstream option on mplayer. I'm not sure whether or not this will yield better results or not. For example:

mplayer -cache 300 -dumpstream http://example.com/stream/path -dumpfile out.mp3
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I'd like to recommend http://streamripper.sourceforge.net/

It does not require/offer a graphical front end and it is more light weighted than VLC or mplayer. When run without special parameters it autodetects and writes tracks to individual files. To save a stream at ${URL} to a single file ${MYSTREAM} for ${SECONDS} use e.g.

streamripper ${URL} -a ${MYSTREAM}_%D -A -l ${SECONDS}

Add --quiet for silent operation.

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