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I am running Mac OS X 10.5.8 Leopard on a 2009 iMac. For when I am not home, how can I turn on/start up/boot my Mac over the internet? I have a Verizon Actiontec router if that helps and I will be using a laptop running Windows 7 whenever I am gone.

As a side question, can the free version of LogMeIn be used at the log in screen?

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First you would need to have a static IP for your router or you should set up A dynamic DNS. DynDNS is great but no longer free (as far as I know). I have used no-IP you will need to log in regularly to keep the account active.

http://www.no-ip.com/services/managed_dns/free_dynamic_dns.html

This will allow you to connect to your router from the internet. Very useful for many other things.

There is a way to do this but it is very complicated and not sure how it would be done for a mac. (sorry I am a pc)

Some people have used LogMeIn to start a computer over the internet that might be your best choice.

This video may help http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3syjuu7qYTA

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LogMeIn does not start the computer. It can't do anything if the computer is off. – Melab Jan 17 '13 at 19:52

Look into Wake-on-LAN. I don't know, though, if your Actiontec router will let you remotely log into it (the router) and send a Wake-on-LAN packet to your computer. If not, you might consider getting a router that can run DD-WRT or Tomato firmware, which does support this.

Alternatively, there do exist power strips that can be remote-controlled over the network, but they tend to be a more expensive solution.

Update: This link may be helpful.

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Doesn't Wake-on-LAN require a local network? Is it a program, a protocol, or a method? – Melab Jan 17 '13 at 19:54
    
Yes, it does. It's a part of the Ethernet standard. Also, I added a link my answer that might help. – jjlin Jan 17 '13 at 23:37

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