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I have written the code for a server-client model on UDP and have tested it between 2 computers that are connected to the Internet, using their WAN IPs, and it works fine.

What I want to do now is to use the first computer/server as a router. Is this possible? Can I take an Ethernet cable out of the computer/server to the second computer/client and create a subnetwork like this?

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Without indicating a specific operating system you want to use on the "computer" that should act as a router, it's not possible to provide specific instructions. –  allquixotic Jan 24 '13 at 14:38

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In short... the answer is Yes.

The longer answer is quite a bit more complex. A router is a computer. The operating system and hardware are specifically designed for the task, but essentially they are the same. As far as setting up your own computer as a router, 99.9% of this question depends on what operating system you are running. Also, the kind of router also makes a difference. Windows has a built-in feature called Internet Connection Shairing which sets up a very simple NAT'ing router, whereas Linux operating systems uses a combination of iptables with the masquerade module and kernel-mode routing. Apple computers are very similar to Linux in the way you configure them, but I'm sure they have a simple GUI for configuring such. If you want a non-NAT'ing router, Linux can do this quite simply, but Windows has no way of doing this (without 3rd party tools) until you get to their Server platforms.

As far as a client/server application goes, there is really no need to implement a router from what I can gather by your question. Can you give some details about the scenario?

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Thank you for your answer. I need to have a LAN where at the center I have the server-router and all around a number of clients. The operating system is Linux. –  user192512 Jan 24 '13 at 16:01

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