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I have a "NETGEAR WGR614 v4" Wireless Router. It has 1 Internet Port & 4 LAN Ports.

It's Default IP is : 192.168.0.1

I can access this router and change it's IP address by opening http:192.168.0.1

I need to connect two different networks using this Router.

1. Polytechnic Network with IPs 172.16.x.x
2. Engineering Network with IPs 172.18.x.x

I need to access one network from the other through the Router..

example: Assume that there is 1 PC with the Following IP settings in the Polytechnic network

IP: 172.16.1.1
SM: 255.255.0.0

Assume that there is 1 PC with the Following IP settings in the Engineering network

IP: 172.18.1.1
SM: 255.255.0.0

I need to ping the 1st PC from the 2nd PC through this router and Vice Versa. Please help me!

Take a look at this video and skip to 2:43 for quicker view of what i am talking about:

www.youtube.com/watch?v=bfwLq3LxnjQ
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Which hardware version? What firmware are you running? Will this router be the two PC's default gateway router? If not, can you configure their existing gateway routers? Or can you add routes on each PC? –  David Schwartz Jan 28 '13 at 11:39
    
Is this only going to be a 1:1 connection or do all of the PCs in the one network need to be able to connect to the other? In other words, is it a possible solution if you have to manually change settings in all affected PCs since there are only 2 or do you need to connect so many that the solution has to be managed by the router? –  uncovery Jan 28 '13 at 11:50
    
Its not a one to one solution.. all computers on one side need to access the computers on the other side.. pls see the video and skip to 2:43 for quick idea.. www.youtube.com/watch?v=bfwLq3LxnjQ –  Pradeep Jan 28 '13 at 11:53
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1 Answer

You probably mean you want to connect three different networks, since the Internet will "count" as a network.

For the router to support this, it needs three interfaces, essentially, a WAN, LAN1, and a LAN2, and a firmware/OS that supports this.

I don't know of any built-in firmware on consumer grade routers providing this capability. Linux has no problem routing between 3 or more interfaces. A router flashed to DD-WRT or Open-WRT provides Linux.

You still need a LAN1 and a LAN2. So you have several options, on a flashed router:

  • The router's wireless capability can be a LAN1 or LAN2. I think most of not all DD-WRT flashed routers allow you to bridge wireless or not bridge wireless. You want it not bridged.
  • If the router supports putting each of the LAN ports in a VLAN, you can split the LAN ports up into two separately routed interfaces. I've never really messed with the VLAN options in the few routers I've flashed to DD-WRT so I don't really know what can be done here or specifically on a Netgear.
  • If the router has a USB interface (for network attached storage), you "might" be able to connect a USB-to-Ethernet adapter and have it work. I've never tried it.

If your Netgear router is not versatile enough, you may have better luck getting an old PC, throwing 3 network cards in it, and setting up basic routing/firewalling with Linux.

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