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How can I disable the Administrator account on Windows 7 Starter Edition? I enabled it using the NT Password and Registry Editor so that I could install software for a client who didn't leave me their netbook password. There doesn't appear to be a way to disable it using Windows itself (no lusrmgr.msc, net user Administrator /enable:no gives an error, no secpol.msc).

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The only way I know how is to log into an administrator account and disable it. Why can't you use the same tool you used to enable it to disable it? –  Ramhound Jan 29 '13 at 12:33
    
The tool doesn't allow me to disable, just to enable. I'm trying to disable it from an administrator account but I can't see any way to do that in Starter Edition. –  mrbridges Jan 29 '13 at 15:10
    
Your options are limited because of the version of Windows being used and the hack you used to enable the account in the first place. It seems you were able to resolve your problem. –  Ramhound Jan 29 '13 at 16:31
    
Isn't it enough to just give the Administrator account a password that the client doesn't know? –  vonbrand Jan 29 '13 at 17:09
    
There's no way that I can see to change the password. –  mrbridges Jan 29 '13 at 18:22

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I solved this by loading the SAM registry hive and editing the Domains\Account\Users\000001F4\F value and setting the 38th byte to 11. 11 is disabled 10 is enabled.

I used the NT Password and Offline Registry Editor http://pogostick.net/~pnh/ntpasswd/regedit.txt to do this. Once you cd to the right key, the commands to edit are as follows:

ed 000001F4
d      <to print>
:38    <enter 11>
d      <to print>
s
quit
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+1 Nice, I will have to remember that one :) –  Bali C Jan 29 '13 at 15:45

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