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I've set out to build a server and I might have ordered the wrong RAM.

The motherboard I'm using is an ASUS KGPE-D16. In the specifications, it states that I can have 256GB of RDIMM or 64GB of UDIMM. The RAM I bought is consumer, CORSAIR Vengeance CMZ32GX3M4X1600C10. The memory format for the RAM is just "DIMM".

The question I have is what type of DIMM is my RAM? RDIMM or UDIMM? Or is it neither, meaning it won't be supported at all?

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migrated from serverfault.com Feb 5 '13 at 1:29

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The memory you linked to is performance memory (XMP extreme profile, heat spreader, ...). As such is is almost guaranteed to be unbuffered. (Buffered/registered memory is always slower). –  Hennes Feb 5 '13 at 1:35

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up vote 8 down vote accepted

Unless you are specifically setting out to by registered RAM, then chances are you've bought Un-Buffered RAM. Un-Buffered RAM makes up the majority of consumer-level RAM available, and registered RAM is typically plastered in warnings it's not for most motherboards.

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So there is no "third type" of RAM just known as DIMM? –  NessDan Feb 5 '13 at 1:35
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No. DIMMs is just the form factor. Registered/buffer, unregistered/unbuffered, and fully buffered are different types (which can come in the same form factor). –  Hennes Feb 5 '13 at 1:36
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@NessDan - DIMM is just a form factor, it means "Dual In-Line Memory Module", as opposed to a SIMM "Symmetrical In-Line Memory Module" (from the 90s). There is also FB-DIMM ("Fully Buffered Inline Memory Module"). Back in the early days of the DIMM you could get away with just calling it a "DIMM", but these days, it's just referred to as a form factor/packaging. –  Mark Henderson Feb 5 '13 at 1:36
    
Thanks guys, so you're for sure that my RAM is UDIMM? (If this is the case, I need to return it right away.) –  NessDan Feb 5 '13 at 1:47
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Yep, that RAM is definitely UDIMM. –  Marcus Chan Feb 5 '13 at 2:06

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