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I am trying to edit my host file to see how it works. But with no success. I enter this in my /etc/host file:

173.194.66.103 www.youtube.com

And when I type 173.194.66.103 on the browser I get redirected to Google (which it is!) instead of YouTube. Anything I am missing out?

Did try this one too but with no success dscacheutil -flushcache

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migrated from stackoverflow.com Feb 8 '13 at 8:44

This question came from our site for professional and enthusiast programmers.

Hostnames are intended to abstract the user from IP addresses. You've got the abstraction backwards.

You can see this quite clearly with a tool like ping:

anew@Wintermute:~$ ping google.ca
PING google.ca (74.125.226.24): 56 data bytes
64 bytes from 74.125.226.24: icmp_seq=0 ttl=57 time=11.224 ms
64 bytes from 74.125.226.24: icmp_seq=1 ttl=57 time=18.605 ms
^C
--- google.ca ping statistics ---
2 packets transmitted, 2 packets received, 0.0% packet loss
round-trip min/avg/max/stddev = 11.224/14.915/18.605/3.690 ms

Now if I add

127.0.0.1 google.ca

to my /etc/hosts file, when I execute ping I see:

anew@Wintermute:~$ ping google.ca
PING google.ca (127.0.0.1): 56 data bytes
64 bytes from 127.0.0.1: icmp_seq=0 ttl=64 time=0.051 ms
64 bytes from 127.0.0.1: icmp_seq=1 ttl=64 time=0.104 ms
^C
--- google.ca ping statistics ---
2 packets transmitted, 2 packets received, 0.0% packet loss
round-trip min/avg/max/stddev = 0.051/0.077/0.104/0.026 ms
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