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I have a main router, router A and a support router, router B. The path to fill the dead spot is as follows: Internets --> Modem --> router A WAN --> router A LAN --> powerline adapter A --> powerline adapter B --> router B LAN --> WiFi to dead spots.

I'm using a powerline adapter (http://www.amazon.com/Netgear-XAVB5101-Powerline-Nano500-Set/dp/B007ILFFS6/ref=sr_1_4?s=pc&ie=UTF8&qid=1360454804&sr=1-4) to avoid having to run a long ethernet cable across the smaller office. It has been tested independently to work well.

I would like to have only one SSID and password for the entire place and only have to configure that at the main router. I experimented with turning router B into bridge mode but am looking for a better solution since that required me to have two independent network names and passwords.

router A ip: 192.168.11.1 router A subnet mask: 255.255.255.0 router B static ip: 192.168.11.2 (one after main router ip) router B subnet mask: 255.255.255.0 router B dhcp server disabled

do I need to configure SSID and WPA2 password to match router A settings? It makes sense to plug router A LAN to router B LAN right? After configuring router B with router A LAN going to its WAN?

I'm pretty new to all this networking stuff but am tech savvy in general so any actual theory or anything you can teach me would be greatly appreciated. Thank you.

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1 Answer 1

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"do I need to configure SSID and WPA2 password to match router A settings?" Yes. Setting the Router B to bridge mode and using the same wireless settings of Router A is the easiest way to make your wireless devices "roam" within your house.

An example on a Linksys router that supports bridge mode (you can always use third party firmware or other routers, but since Linksys has a database of UI, I used it for print screens)

one

For RouterB's wireless settings:

two

You must use different channels for the RouterA's wireless settings (Channel of either 1 or 6 since RouterB is using 11).

Basically it is a choice of 1, 6 or 11.

"It makes sense to plug router A LAN to router B LAN right? After configuring router B with router A LAN going to its WAN?" For bridging, using RouterA's LAN port to RouterB's WAN port is needed. If the router's firmware doesn't support bridging, it will then be RouterA's LAN port to RouterB's LAN port.

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thank you for this quality description. i am carrying this out now –  tarabyte Feb 10 '13 at 23:22
    
i unfortunately couldn't get this to work. there is some overlap of the routers and it varies during the day when there is much more conflict from neighboring networks. i don't see how this is not something simpler –  tarabyte Feb 13 '13 at 19:31

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