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When I right-click in a window showing my C:\ directory in Windows 7 and try to create a new text file, I get an error message: "A required privilege is not held by the client." Why is this and how can I change it?

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Can you do it from an elevated notepad? Explorer.exe is not elevated. –  Phoshi Oct 13 '09 at 19:36
    
Yes I can. My question is, why has my root directory been made less accessible in this way? –  Tommy Herbert Oct 13 '09 at 19:39
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Because if you can access your root, so can IAmAVirus.exe! It's a good thing, honest. –  Phoshi Oct 13 '09 at 19:41

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The C: drive is protected from modification by normal users. Unless your an administrator or can elevate another process to administrator, you won't be able to write to C: drive except in your C:/Users/ folder.

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IF you right click C: in the Computer view, go to security, you'll notice that you won't have Write permissions. You get Read/Execute, List Files, and Read.

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I am an administrator - this is my own laptop. Is there no way to lift the protection? –  Tommy Herbert Oct 13 '09 at 19:42
    
You can try to add Full Access as a permission for your account. But it is not recommended. If you need to store a file somewhere, the best place is on another drive, or in your users folder. –  Justin Drury Oct 13 '09 at 19:44
    
You need to add Full Access to your account on C:\. Since Vista, this directory is protected, as it's one of the favorite places for viruses. In any case, too many irreplaceable system files reside there. –  harrymc Oct 13 '09 at 19:49
    
I understand Phoshi's point that a virus could pose as a user, but I've experimentally granted myself Write permission in C:\\. I still can't create a text file from Explorer, though. –  Tommy Herbert Oct 13 '09 at 19:52
    
You need full access to create a file, iirc. –  Justin Drury Oct 13 '09 at 19:55

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