Take the 2-minute tour ×
Super User is a question and answer site for computer enthusiasts and power users. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Can I differentiate between waking the Windows OS (Windows 7 and/or 8) from a mouse click vs mouse move? I only want the system to wake upon a click on the mouse but not when I move the mouse. I assume this is not a functionality considered in the Power Management options but maybe something can be done in the Registry? Any ideas?

share|improve this question
1  
Check your motherboard BIOS if there is such a possibility, Although I have not seen a lot of cooperative models in this respect. –  Hashirama Senju Feb 16 '13 at 1:32
    
Can you name a single motherboard that has such feature? Mine does not and I checked the obvious before I posted this question –  Matt Wolf Feb 16 '13 at 2:15
    
I do not recall which motherboard had that option, it was a long time ago so it's a difficult question. But usually it looks something like this: img.tomshardware.com/us/2005/09/22/bios_for_beginners/… –  Hashirama Senju Feb 16 '13 at 10:58
1  
@HashiramaSenju, I do not see how your link points to anything that differentiates between mouse click vs mouse movements to awake a PC from sleep. –  Matt Wolf Feb 16 '13 at 17:07
    
+1 because it would be a cool feature to have. It's really easy to bump a mouse or touchpad accidentally. A click is a bit less likely to be accidental. I suppose you could write your own screensaver and have it respond (or not respond) to whatever events you desire, but unless you're a really good coder, it would have to be started manually by you - not just from the system input being idle or another power management event. –  Joe Feb 19 '13 at 9:45

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

It would be a cool feature to have, but unfortunately it does not appear to be possible; Windows can be configured (via the 'powercfg' command -- 'powercfg /?' for more detail) to treat input from a given USB HID device as a reason (or not a reason) to wake from sleep, but not to differentiate between types of input. Writing a program to do that sort of differentiation would be relatively trivial, but by the time the machine can run that program to decide whether or not to wake up, it's already awake, and would instead have to decide whether or not to go back to sleep -- which probably doesn't help.

As a workaround, you might consider simply disabling the mouse as a device that can wake the PC; if you don't have a keyboard on the table next to the mouse, then this may not be a useful option, but it looks to be as close as you're going to get to what you're looking to accomplish. To do so, open a command shell and run

powercfg /devicequery wake_armed

You'll see your mouse device named in the list, possibly along with other devices. To disable wake input from the mouse, do

powercfg /devicedisablewake <name of mouse device>

And if you decide to re-enable it later, do so via

powercfg /deviceenablewake <name of mouse device>

Or you could just switch off the wireless mouse when you're not using it, which as a bonus may make its battery last a little bit longer.

share|improve this answer
2  
Given the apparent impossibility of what I asked for I still mark your answer for the effort put in, thanks. –  Matt Wolf Feb 21 '13 at 16:09
    
Glad to be of help, and thanks for the accept! –  Aaron Miller Feb 22 '13 at 19:58
    
Turning the wireless mouse off is what I do - it's practically second nature. But with a wired mouse, I have no choice except to disable it from waking the computer up from sleep, and then simply depending on the power button to wake it up. I don't know why it was never made an industry standard to ignore mouse moves at a BIOS level, given that pretty much everyone who used a computer must have run into this annoyance at some point in their life. –  ADTC Apr 11 at 4:03
1  
@ADTC Listening for a USB HID packet is cheaper than parsing it, would be my guess. –  Aaron Miller Apr 11 at 22:49

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.