Super User is a question and answer site for computer enthusiasts and power users. Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Here's how it works:
  1. Anybody can ask a question
  2. Anybody can answer
  3. The best answers are voted up and rise to the top

I have my temp directory (C:\Temp - system variable) mounted to an NTFS folder on an SSD (via Diskmanagement > Change or Assign Drive Letters > mount to empty NTFS folder).

This mounting behaviour is not affected by logging on / off or system restart. However, the mount will disappear randomly, most notably when closing Visual Studio, but also on other occasions. When this happens, a new Temp directory will be created on C:\, which is then used henceforth, meaning I have to empty it, and remount to volume into C:\Temp (all the data on the volume is retained).

Does anybody know the cause of this strange behavior, and know how to prevent it?

share|improve this question

I don't know the cause, but you may have better luck using a soft link to point to your drive instead of an ntfs folder, being that this is a windows generated folder. Does the same behavior happen if you use a different folder? assigning your ssd to C:\Temp2 or to C:\user\\documents\special_folder for example? if the behavior doesn't exist when it's mounted to a different (non system) folder, you can assume that the reason is because of where you've chosen to mount it.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for symlink. – gronostaj Feb 20 '13 at 14:32
    
Hi MDMoore, this behaviour only occurs with the temp folder; have another folder mounted in this way, and it is absolutely fine. Softlink not bad idea - will give it a try, though I am concerned that the result will be the same, namely Windows deleting the link and creating a directory. Pretty sure the location of the mount is not the issue, as the other (persistent) folder is mounted to a partition on the same drive. – telemach Feb 20 '13 at 16:01
    
make sure if you try the softlink you use mklink /d, as the default is a file symbolic link and not a directory. – BigHomie Feb 20 '13 at 16:13

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .