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I have an inaccessible SD card, and I need to manually rewrite the tables for the filesystem.

Is there a method I can use to directly edit these file system tables in Windows 8? It should preferably also allow me to alter single sectors.

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Specify your OS. –  Petr Abdulin Mar 1 '13 at 6:06
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2 Answers

If you're using Windows, WinHex is an nice choice. See features.

  • Viewing, editing, and repairing system areas

    such as the Master Boot Record with its partition table and boot sectors. Tools | Disk Editor | Access button

WinHex disk editor

WinHex contains MBR templates, so when you browsing the MBR using template, it will show a window with many editable input boxes and their descriptions.

WinHex MBR template


If you're using Linux, you can try hexedit, it's a command line tool with text user interface.

Basic shortcuts:

  • Ctrl+X: save and exit
  • Ctrl+C: exit without saving

linux hexedit

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HxD is the tool you need (if you use Windows).

HxD is a carefully designed and fast hex editor which, additionally to raw disk editing and modifying of main memory (RAM), handles files of any size.

The easy to use interface offers features such as searching and replacing, exporting, checksums/digests, insertion of byte patterns, a file shredder, concatenation or splitting of files, statistics and much more.

Editing works like in a text editor with a focus on a simple and task-oriented operation, as such functions were streamlined to hide differences that are purely technical. For example, drives and memory are presented similar to a file and are shown as a whole, in contrast to a sector/region-limited view that cuts off data which potentially belongs together. Drives and memory can be edited the same way as a regular file including support for undo. In addition memory-sections define a foldable region and inaccessible sections are hidden by default.

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@DaveRook thanks for the edit! I'll keep that in mind, for future answers. –  Petr Abdulin Mar 1 '13 at 9:14
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