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I'm always googling for the correct package-name and would really like to set up my system so that if I want to install Midnight Commander, for example I can just type

QUERYCOMMAND midnight commander

and it will perform the necessary search for me...if it isn't in the regular repositories, maybe provide a link to the newest AUR tarball? Does anyone have any ideas about how to do this?

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2 Answers 2

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pacman -Q <package name>

https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/Pacman#Querying_package_databases

To search the AUR, you can use a tool like Yaourt to accomplish this.

Once installed, the command would be yaourt <package name>.

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For installing from AUR you can look into the helper programs like pacmatic and yaourt, although the Arch way is preferable: wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/AUR#Installing_packages –  sbtkd85 Mar 8 '13 at 21:40

Just use Yaourt. It automatically searches both the repositories and the AUR by default. It also allows you to install the AUR packages just as easily as normal packages.

To install a package you know the name of (either in AUR or repositories):

yaourt -S <package name>

To search (both name and description) for a package both in AUR and the repositories:

yaourt -Ss ANY NUMBER OF KEYWORDS

To search and interactively choose which packages to install:

yaourt KEYWORDS TO SEARCH FOR

The quickest way to install Yaourt would be to run the command:

bash <(curl aur.sh) -si package-query yaourt

This uses the aur.sh AUR helper to download Yaourt and its dependencies.


Using pacman -Q <package name> actually just lists programs you already have installed. I don't know why that would be a relevant answer to the question.

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