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I have Googled a lot of articles on dual boot, or even triple boot`, but noting matches perfectly with what I have on mind. But I hope to cautious and get some intelligent advise before actually doing it.

Currently:

I have a small HDD(256G), a small SSD(80G). The HDD has lenovo pre-installed Win7 Pro. The SSD is brand new. I have genuine copies of Win8, Mountain Lion and Ubuntu 12.04 available on USB. No CD drive on my laptop.

Plan:

I hope to triple boot the three OS. Win8 will be my primary OS, so I plan to put it on the SSD, along with my all other major Win8 programs. I would use OSX only occasionally basically just for XCode, and Ubuntu for... fun, so I plan to put them on the HDD, after completely wiping out the pre-installed Win7 (or not?).

Question: Is this an advisable approach? How do I choose which hard drive to boot from now? Would anyone recommend a better organization? And any other general tip/advice? Thanks!

Resource:

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Not too sure about the Hackintosh bit. See this meta question for more. Dual-booting Windows and Linux is not a problem at all, and it's recommended that you install Linux later so Grub2 can take over. If you want to do it the other way round and add Linux to Windows' boot menu, use EasyBCD. –  Karan Mar 13 '13 at 5:18
    
If Windows bootmanager will be in control see this guide boyans.net/DualBootWindows7andLinuxOrUnix.html part for OS X is the hardest. –  snayob Mar 15 '13 at 0:53

1 Answer 1

you're going to end up installing windows on its partition, then your hackintosh disto (usually found on the torrent websites -- also will likely be a version for your computer or you might have to do some tweaking to get it working). After you have your hackintosh installed, you will notice it broke your windows install (you wont be able to boot windows). This is normal. Last install your Linux distro to its partition and have it install grub to the primary hard drive (whatever drive you installed windows and osx to). Grub should detect the other OS's and provide a chainboot into the windows bootloader (allowing windows to boot) or boot to osx.

Dual booting caveats: osx and windows will fight over who controls booting... causing you to sometimes loose boot ability till you fix your setup. Running Linux as one of your boots saves the day since grub will take care of things rather nicely.

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