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Hi: I want to replace my existing stock 320GB spinning hard drive with a 256GB SSD. What is the procedure for doing this? Is it something like make a Windows Image copy of the current HD on an external USB hard drive, then install the new SSD and then boot-up the Windows recovery CD and copy from the external HD onto the new SSD? Or does installing the new SSD require a bunch of drivers to be installed? Also, how can I be certain the t410 supports the SSD? What is the correct size to buy for it? Is there any point in getting a 6gb SATAIII SSD if the laptop itself only has SATA I ?

Sorry about the general questions but I really don't know how to proceed.

Thank you.

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closed as not constructive by techie007, Canadian Luke, Renan, Mokubai, Nifle Mar 17 '13 at 13:43

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You can't use the built in Windows backup to do what you describe as it doesn't support restoring a system image to a smaller volume. The manufacturer may supply a cloning tool to do what you want. –  David Marshall Mar 16 '13 at 19:24
    
Have you checked out the hardware manuals on-line from Lenovo? –  FredrikD Mar 17 '13 at 7:47
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2 Answers

Installing an SSD is just like installing a regular hard drive. They are all the same physical size and have the same ports. You may need to put something like insulation foam if there is a lot of space and the screws won't hold it down. Only an inch by inch square will do with some tacky tape.

I haven't cloned one but a clean installation goes good. If your laptop only has SATA I that's as fast as it goes. A SATA III hard drive won't give you any extra speed. I haven't came across a situation where I needed extra drivers with windows 7 or 8.

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Adding foam will possibly be an issue. A proper adapter would be the best solution. There are also several thicknesses of a 2.5" drive –  Dave M Mar 16 '13 at 20:01
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Also, how can I be certain the t410 supports the SSD?

First things first - compatability. Check the specs for your exact model support.lenovo.com T410. The HDD tray may already have an adaptor, or it could be a SATA connection. Confusing by the spec sheet (attached)

Connector type: As noted for HDD option from link above. Lenovo info My first impression is that the drive may be mSata type, not SATA.

So you may want to pull the drive first to ensure what you want to buy will connect.

This adaptor is just to demonstrat the difference in size of each connector type.

mSATA Size (I could not find a mSATA male plug for best compare, but you get an idea of size)

mSata size

SATA size

SATA Size

Is there any point in getting a 6gb SATAIII SSD if the laptop itself only has SATA I? Only if the SATA III is econimical, if a similar sized SATA II is available for less money, that would be the one to go to. If your laptop has SATA I you will not get the SSD drive's advertised performanceat SATA II or III speeds. That being said, you should still see an improvment over the plater drive.

A clean install and using easy transfer would be a good option to ensure windows applies the correct options for the SSD (Trim enabled, prefetch/superfetch and indexing) are correctly set up. You can do this mannualy, but a clean install is a good option in my opinion.

As the capasity of drives differ, it may not be possible to do a true image transfer.

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