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I'm checking the Core temperature using CoreTemp utility in Windows while gaming (GTA4, Batman Arkham City 2) on the following hardware:

  • Intel i7 2600 (LGA 1155)
  • Asus P8Z68 PRO/GEN-3 Mobo
  • 8x2 GB Corsair DDR3 RAM
  • Gigabyte Nvidia Geforce GTX 570 1.25 GB DDR5 Graphics Card
  • Cooler Master Extreme Power Plus 600W PSU

A few minutes into a graphics heavy application or game, Coretemp reports maximum temperatures of each core reaching a maximum of 98 Degrees Celsius. After that while still gaming, it slowly comes down and each core stabilizes at temperatures between 75 to 90 Degrees celsius depending on the usage.

Are these temperatures normal ?

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They could be normal, but it's worth investigating to be sure. What cooler do you have? Are you 100% sure it's properly mounted? What's your ambient temperature? How well-cooled is the case itself? –  David Schwartz Mar 18 '13 at 4:07
    
Ambient temperature (of the room) on average would be around 28 Degrees Celsius. System is well ventilated and mounted. Graphics card has 3 fans on it and there are the standard heat sinks on the motherboard besides one fan inside the cabinet and another one dedicated to cooling the processor. I too am inclined to believe that this is normal and was hoping to see some re-assuring inputs to confirm. –  PKM Mar 18 '13 at 4:16
    
It may be running, but pushing towards the thermal limit is not healthy in the long run. Your ambient temperature is too high, in my opinion. If at all possible or desirable, running a tube outside for air-in and out would be good. –  Ярослав Рахматуллин Mar 18 '13 at 5:52
    
All right. Ambient temperature isn't really in my control (in India) which in my location is considered cool by local standards :P Will report back if any undesirable symptoms due to core temperature manifest themselves in the system. –  PKM Mar 18 '13 at 6:20

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The fan is doing it's job by brining down and stabailizing, but the temps seem high. The hard part is that you may not get an accurate read from third party temp monitors.

As this is a custom built rig, there are a few things you should review and wipe off the list of potential culprates (if in fact the temps run this hot):

  • Check that the heat sink is attached properly (all corners are down and attached to the board).
  • Check for BIOS update. Could be a fan/temp/CPU update for your board.
  • Thermal grease - you used not too much and not too little?
  • Be sure case is clean and heat sink free of dust.

The cpu may be running hot but it is under load and is not shutting down the system. That is the true sign of overheating and protection will kick in one the thermal limit has been reached.

Intel also has a processor diagnotic tool that could be useful.

Also a reaffiming note from communities.intel.com

Anything from the Tcase and below will be the expected temperature of the processor in normal use, anything that doesn't stress out the processor (watching movies, burning CDs, browsing the internet, creating documents, etc.) When the processor is stressed out meaning that you are running heavy processor applications that take control of the CPU or uses it at 100% the temperature will go beyond the Tcase. It can perfectly reach 90 to 95 degrees and the processor will still be OK. The cooling fan is in charge to keep that temperature there.
If the processor temperature reaches 100°C or more it will send a signal to the motherboard to shut down to prevent mayor damages and most likely it won't be possible to turn the computer back in until it cools down.

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Thanks for your reply. The note from the intel forum matches the behavior seen on my system. This and the fact that a friend of mine has an identical system (and he's a heavy animator) which reports the same figures indicates to me that there is no cause to be unduly worried. There are some options in the BIOS for increasing fan speed and I havent touched the heatsinks. I'm using the stock thermal grease as I didnt want to risk anything by shoddy application of custom thermal paste. Never had a situation where the system refused to shut down or it croseed Tjmax and was forcefully shutdown. –  PKM Mar 18 '13 at 4:51

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