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Similar to how you can scp over ssh, is there something similar for over rdp?

I'm currently using the \tsclient\ (i.e. mapped drives) when on the remote server. But I wondering if there is a way of doing something similar triggered from the client (similar to how SCP works?).

I realise I could install FTP, WebDav etc, but just wondering if there is a built in tool.

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i'm perhaps not understanding your question 'cos it has been a while with these tools. but why not map drive and share it, within RDP? You mention FTP so surely mapping a drive is as good? unless perhaps.. is it encryption you want? or command line? –  barlop Mar 18 '13 at 15:56
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He is looking for a built in tool that can do a client side push of data, instead of a server side pull of the data. –  Scott Chamberlain Mar 18 '13 at 16:04
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2 Answers

No, there is no client initiated copy functionality without using 3rd party tools other than what the clipboard can handle.

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You can share your local drive(s) over rdp and they will show up as network mapped shares on the remote side. You can copy on the remote side into/from them.

EDIT: Misunderstood the original question. The above is what the questioner currently uses.

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That is the \\tsclient solution he said he is already currently doing, and he was asking if there was a solution other than that. –  Scott Chamberlain Mar 18 '13 at 16:02
    
Thanks Bgs, Scott is right that's the tsclient solution - I've updated my question with more detail. –  Alex Key Mar 18 '13 at 16:11
    
I see. The \tsclient\ wasn't obvious to me. Now it's clear. Now I agree with Scott as well... :) –  Bgs Mar 18 '13 at 16:31
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