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My Toshiba laptop is completely dusted out and I keep it on a dinner plate to keep a consistent air flow. The problem is the fan stops. I know that it is supposed to turn on when needed but it doesn't do that... at least not when I need it the most.

When the fan stops my core temp rose to 100 Degrees... and the fan still would not turn on, and thus the computer shut down.

I have speedfan but it isn't exactly user friendly... all I want is an option that allows me to turn on the fan and KEEP it on. I went into my BIOS and could not any fan options.

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Power it off, pop the battery out to be sure all circuits are dead, and blow the dust out with an air bottle, compressor (take care not to dislodge anything - those critters are powerful), or vacuum cleaner (again, take care). That always worked for me. If the fan doesn't turn on at 100 °C, however... either the thermal sensor is busted, or the fan is. If you're lucky, the fan is simply clogged externally, and a good air blow will make it work again. If you are less lucky, it's clogged internally and has to either be disassembled, cleaned and lubricated, or (better) replaced altogether. – lserni Mar 22 '13 at 22:54
    
Sounds like it could be a dying fan. Why not take it in to a shop and get a new one installed? – Ƭᴇcʜιᴇ007 Mar 23 '13 at 2:42

Have you considered a 'laptop cooling pad'? A laptop cooling pad generally has two or more constant fans that would help to keep your laptop cool, and they are relatively inexpensive.

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The fan does work, but turns on and off intermittently, I just find it odd that it would not turn on when the core got really hot. I was hoping to find a way to keep the fan on contently, but I guess I really will need to get one of those cooling pads after all. – Crystal Mar 23 '13 at 0:22
    
I'd suggest you also consider Iserni's answer - give that a try, failing that, listen to Techie007's advice, and take it along to a PC repair shop and see how much they would charge to have a look at it for you. A cooling pad 'may' be cheaper and solve the overheating problem, but it would reduce the mobility of the laptop, having to carry a cooling pad, as well as the laptop. – Jake Elsley Mar 23 '13 at 13:37

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